Author Topic: Keg Lost CO2  (Read 8921 times)

Offline Wfu1bunn

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Keg Lost CO2
« on: October 12, 2014, 03:53:41 PM »
Recently made a kegerator.  A week ago hooked it up.  Today the CO2 tank is empty. Must have a leak.  Two questions:  1) does the regulator nut need a washer? 2) wondering that since I tapped and carbonated the beer, but now that it has no CO2, how long will the beer be good?  I will fill my tank tomorrow, but am hoping the two kegs I have aren't ruined.

Thanks.

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2014, 04:26:02 PM »
I've had a similar issue, and my solution was to close things up at the tank when not in use. Once it's carbonated, I see no reason to keep it charged. When I'm pouring beer I open up the CO2, and then close it when I'm done. As far as washers go, I'd think you need one at every connection. Oh, and your beer should be fine.
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Offline Wfu1bunn

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2014, 04:52:17 PM »
I appreciate that!  Once it is carbonated, how long will it typically stay carbonated?

Offline merfizle

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2014, 06:24:21 PM »
Assuming no leaks, indefinitely.  I, too, only bump the keg with CO2 when necessary.  Usually after several pints.

Mark
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Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2014, 06:28:09 PM »
Indefinitely as long as the keg is pressurized and there are no leaks. Oh, and I also shut the valve at the regulator. That way any leaks are isolated. If you're still losing pressure then it may be a bad seal on the keg lid or a loose release valve.

The best thing to do is to get all the seals right so you can keep everything open. When I first started kegging, I made the mistake of putting the CO2 tank and regulator inside the cooler. Water condensed, metal oxidized, and now the regulator doesn't regulate anymore. It tells me what the pressure is, but it's up to me to turn the gas on and off.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2014, 06:40:51 PM »
Also, make sure the keg lid gasket is lubricated. Not dripping, but not dry either. That's been a problem for me in the past, so now every time I fill a keg I spray StarSan around the lid and look for bubbles. If I see any I re-seat the lid. If that doesn't work I replace the gasket. I've been using cheap mineral oil instead of expensive silicone lube, but some people say that's a bad idea.  So far the results have been good, so I'm going to keep doing what I'm doing.
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Offline twhitaker

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2014, 12:33:27 PM »
I find that initially bumping the keg up to 25 psi helps all those o-rings and seals seat firmly. after carbonation, I keep it about 8 psi and dispense. If I turn it off or lower it, the seals may release a bit. and require reseating with a bump in pressure. Make sure the valve you turn off  is after the output of the regulator. I always leak test , use a star san "soap" check by spraying some on and watch for bubbles. use a small brush and lather it up completely around all fittings. leaks can be hard to see initially. I use a food grade white grease made for food equipment lubrication on all seals. Just a bit, work it around with fingers.
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Offline Slobrew

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2014, 07:49:00 AM »
My regulator definitely has a gasket and I'm pretty sure you should have one too. Make sure all your connections are good and snug. You can put some star-san solution in a spray bottle and spray all your connections from the regulator to the keg once the system is pressurized and if you have a leak the solution should start bubbling and then you will know where the leak is. I never turn off my CO2 and I can run 4 corny kegs in my setup. My gas supply is a 5# bottle and it works for at least 6 kegs. I really don't fool around with the gas, I set it at serving pressure and leave it alone.

Your beer will not spoil because it doesn't have CO2 on it, so you should be ok on that end.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2014, 07:53:17 AM by Slobrew »

Offline Tippy

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Re: Keg Lost CO2
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2014, 07:57:22 PM »
I find that initially bumping the keg up to 25 psi helps all those o-rings and seals seat firmly.

I ran into this just the other day.  I had a keg that would not seal at my normal 10-12 psi.  I tried reseating the lid, keg lube, everything.  Then I turned the regulator up to 30 psi and hammered the keg.  Seated the ring and held pressure all night.

 

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