Author Topic: hallertau vs. hallertauer  (Read 12241 times)

Offline jtoots

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hallertau vs. hallertauer
« on: May 04, 2014, 04:49:42 PM »
has anyone had the opportunity to give these a side by side comparison that they can share?

Offline brewfun

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Re: hallertau vs. hallertauer
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2014, 05:36:24 PM »
That's a valid, but a little confusing question. First, you have to define what you mean by "Hallertau." In German, the addition of "er" means where something or someone originated.

Hallertau is a world class hop growing region in Bavaria. Hops calling themselves Hallertau and Hallertauer are simply using the region as a reference point of origin. It's important to know if the hops were actually grown in Hallertau or somewhere else, like the US. Hop brokers are careful to label boxes as US Hallertau, though some retailers might not.

A lot of hops that you're familiar with have "Hallertau" as the first part of their name, but since that's a bit cumbersome we simply omit that word.

Hallertau Mittelfruh is the oldest lineage from the region and is the "true" noble variety grown there. However, this variety has been successfully crossbred since the early 20th century for disease resistance and other aromatics, effectively broadening the "noble" category. Of the four Noble varieties, hops have to be grown in this region and draw a lineage to Mittelfruh to be considered "Hallertau" type hops.

Some others that have been derived from Hallertau cross breeding programs:
Hersbrucker (designed to replace Mittelfruh)
Horizon
Magnum
Tarus
Tradition

Hallertau Gold is one of the newer disease resistant varieties that is used as a replacement for Mittelfruh. In some tellings, Northern Brewer has Hallertau roots.

So, now comes some more confusion. Hops grown in this region under the Hallertau Hop Growers Association rules can use Hallertau in the name even if there is no Mittelfruh in its' parentage. Growers in this region are responding to the demand for non-traditional aromatics in hops. I tasted multiple beers made with four new varietals, each having stronger, more "American Citrus" notes in them. One even seemed to be very similar to Nelson Sauvin.
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Offline jtoots

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Re: hallertau vs. hallertauer
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2014, 06:36:06 AM »
Bravo, Brewfun, Bravo.  Thanks for the thorough response.