Author Topic: Zymurgy article  (Read 6408 times)

KernelCrush

  • Guest
Zymurgy article
« on: September 02, 2014, 04:08:40 PM »
I read this months article 'Cracking the Code to Perfect Fermentation' a couple of times.   I try to keep an open mind, but it contradicts a lot of what Ive read in the Yeast book and manufacturer websites.   Anyone else at odds with this article?

Offline grathan

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 734
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2014, 02:14:56 PM »
I haven't read it, maybe you can give some examples?

KernelCrush

  • Guest
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2014, 05:54:54 PM »
I have to skim it again without the beer goggles I'm wearing, don't want to misquote the article. 


Offline Freak

  • Freak Brothers Homebrew
  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 155
  • Brutally Freaking Honest
    • Freak Brothers Homebrew
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2014, 07:59:48 PM »
I am usually at odds with most of what I am told is "The Facts". I can spend my time listening to what others think or, I can do what works for me. The proof is in the beer. Don't let yourself be restricted by the opinions of others. Brew, taste, analyze, adjust, brew again. In time, people will be asking you how you did it. Then you can sit back and tell them that the only way to figure it out is to brew for years and years on their system, with their water and, with ingredients from their source. Technique is one thing but.... it's one thing. The rest is dictated by many other factors.
Brewing massive amounts of freakin' good beer since 1991. We had to learn the hard way. No homebrew stores or beer nerds (like me) to talk to back then. Just pure passion and determination. Relax, Don't Worry, Have A Homebrew! -23 Karma! Yee Ha!! It went up! Smite me if you must but, trust me.

KernelCrush

  • Guest
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2014, 03:00:14 AM »
Quote
the only way to figure it out is to brew for years and years on their system, with their water and, with ingredients from their source. Technique is one thing but.... it's one thing. The rest is dictated by many other factors.

Agreed.  There is just too much in play to generalize.  All we can say is that's how it works when I am brewing on my system.  Trying to brew a clone or someone else's recipe will get you beer but likely not what you wanted.  Best is to brew a beer you like, then clone it. 

KernelCrush

  • Guest
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2014, 03:42:09 AM »
Quote
maybe you can give some examples?

The article gives a thumbs up to Fermentis, but recommends hydration at 105F.  Fermentis instructions are specific to the strain, ranging from 73F for lagers to 80F for ales and specialties.  I've only used fermentis for dry yeast, other manufacturers may tolerate higher temps. 

They say cell counts aren't important (with no alternative method) but then stress proper cell counts thru the rest of the article. 

recommends starter gravity at 1.030.  Recent recommendations elsewhere have been drifting lower but 1.030 is the low end.  less growth.  It doesn't bring up inoculation rates.

The article discussed various means of aeration without any ppm dissolved O2 recommendations.  It says 30 seconds pure O2for starters in general, 3 minutes for 'standard' beers and 5 minutes for 'big' beers without mentioning a flow rate.

Something I was looking for was more on fermentation temperature management, not just control at one specific temperature or diacetyl rest information

Using Rubbermaid containers for yeast harvesting & storage are fine if they are brand new or unscratched. 

The article says you can store harvested yeast up to 2 months. 

I guess I was just expecting more from an article with such a handsome title.


Offline brewfun

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2288
  • Malt dust is just alcohol's glitter
Re: Zymurgy article
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2014, 06:04:48 AM »
The proof is in the beer.

Maybe. If the beer isn't stable, repeatable and  exactly as predicted, then it's proof that more information and skill may be required. This is precisely why someone would seek out advice.

Quote
Technique is one thing but.... it's one thing. The rest is dictated by many other factors.

I would say that technique is everything. From crush to packaging, it's all technique. How a brewer controls (or doesn't) the "many other factors" is the very definition of technique.

The dream of a great number of brewers is to go pro. That's a bigger leap than a lot of homebrewer's realize. The two have hops, malt and a boil in common, but then those pesky "many other factors" take over. If you don't know how to manage them going in, it's going to be an expensive process of "brew, taste, adjust" to learn it all.

Homebrewing is a hobby of infinite minutiae. It sometimes makes me groan a little to see the mass-lager-like precision some of them want to have with their beer, the overall desire to understand and improve their beer is quite respectable.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.

 

modification