Author Topic: Global Beer Preference Patterns  (Read 6542 times)

Offline beerlover90

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Global Beer Preference Patterns
« on: September 21, 2014, 03:26:19 AM »
Hi guys ..i am interning for a marketing division of a brewing company and am are trying to identify beer preference patterns globally...A part of it is this survey and i desperately need a few responses. Request all of you to take a couple of minutes out and fill it up!

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/106J4aGfgKK6DDv8dCahrkS_SCh8IyCAurOYetYfOASM/viewform?usp=send_form



Sorry for the spam! but who wouldn't like to work for a brewing company :D

Offline Beer_Tigger

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2014, 06:34:38 AM »
Seems like this is focused on helping Budweiser / InBev.

Most of us on this forum have a bad taste in our mouth because of large Global Domination beer companies like that.  Perhaps not the right place to go for answers you may not want to hear. 

Personally, I cancelled the survey as soon as I saw it's about Bud.  I don't want to help a company like that crush the craft beer market.
"Let's see if this here beer will help me to stop procrastinating." - my cousin

Offline brewfun

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2014, 12:49:13 PM »
Hopefully, this can lead to some constructive discussion about marketing guiding preferences.

As homebrewers and beer geeks, we are uniquely positioned to make beer solely for our own preferences and interests. But, who among us hasn't seen our preferences shift over time? And who among us hasn't spent time educating friends on why beer is good?

My opinion is that the Craft industry is short sighting itself by labeling everything as "IPA." To me, it's the same thing as when the majors educated everyone that crisp, clean, no aftertaste was the pinnacle of beer. Not everyone brews, but everyone takes in information to form preferences.

Tony Magee, founder of Lagunitas, is sort of a Zen Master about this very topic. To paraphrase several things he's said, "You, the Craft Drinker, conjured this whole industry. You drive it's growth and direction. The Majors don't get that. They want to define you as simple demographics that can be understood by bean counters. You're more complex than that and don't have permanent preferences. The success of Blue Moon and Shocktop are simply signs of demand that is greater than our whole industry can supply, for now."

Hate on the majors all you want, but until recently, only they could pay top notch brewers a solid wage. Now, we regularly see brewers coming to work for craft from that industry. As far as I'm concerned, Craft has nothing to worry about until we see big names cross back over.

Fifteen years ago, barrel aged beer was a once-a-year specialty from a few breweries. Now, not only barrel aged, but sours can be an entire brewery concept. The majors are just now coming to grips with more bitterness and aftertaste. We are sooooo far ahead of them. And we're still pioneering this stuff.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.

KernelCrush

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2014, 05:10:46 PM »
Quote
Tony Magee, founder of Lagunitas, is sort of a Zen Master about this very topic. To paraphrase several things he's said, "You, the Craft Drinker, conjured this whole industry. You drive it's growth and direction. The Majors don't get that. They want to define you as simple demographics that can be understood by bean counters. You're more complex than that and don't have permanent preferences. The success of Blue Moon and Shocktop are simply signs of demand that is greater than our whole industry can supply, for now."

Randy Mosher in Radical Brewing in the Introduction has a good take on this too.  Its like a football half-time speech for brewers.

There is a new book release from Amazon too named "We Make Beer".  There is a quote in it "Hey, We're Making Beer, Man.  You would have to read the book to get it.


Offline brewfun

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2014, 07:16:44 PM »
There is a new book release from Amazon too named "We Make Beer".  There is a quote in it "Hey, We're Making Beer, Man.  You would have to read the book to get it.

I have that book. I'm in that book....

Check out Chapter 10: "It's always gratifying when someone says 'this is the best beer or this is the only beer I drink here.... How could I get tired of hearing that? We always knew in Craft Beer we'd have groupies. They just forgot to tell us that they'd all have beer bellies and facial hair." - Yours, Truly.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2014, 07:34:34 PM »
I keep Miller Hi Life for a friend of mine that I'll never be able to convert.  I also will occasionally buy a pack of the tall cans of mass produced American Pilsner, but only so that I can stick it up a chickens a** for beer butt chicken on my grill...I'm not wasting my good homebrew on that...

There are uses for swill, if you try hard enough!
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Offline brewfun

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Re: Global Beer Preference Patterns
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2014, 08:42:15 PM »
There are uses for swill, if you try hard enough!

A catering company I once worked for made the best beer bread I've ever had. It used Coors Light, which gave it just the right fragrance but no bitterness. 

On a 100+ degree day in Sacramento, a pitcher of PBR and bowls of Moules Frite are pretty tasty!

There's a time and a place for everything. Sometimes a beer just needs to be refreshing and nothing to think about.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.