Author Topic: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.  (Read 3643 times)

Offline darens1

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I have a 12 Gallon brew pot and tried my first all grain with a brew sack. I started with about 7 gallons water. heater water to initial temp of 165 and mixed in the grain and shut off heat and put on the lid and insulation. I removed lid and checked  temp which was about 150. The flame was restarted somehow left on low but additional heat got up to around 195-200 at about 50 minutes.  I shut off the heat and drained and sparked for about 10 minutes. I then proceeded to the boil and ended with about 6 gallons of London Porter. Is there any chance it's drinkable? I probably could have used some adult supervision but that's what happened.

Offline MaltLicker

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2015, 10:14:49 AM »
All depends on the time it took to get above ~170F or so.  Conversion at 150F to 158F could be fairly rapid if conditions were otherwise favorable, so if that lasted at least 25-30 mins, most conversion may have occurred. 

Once it got too hot for enzymes to work and then survive, conversion would have stopped. 
« Last Edit: March 08, 2015, 11:08:14 AM by MaltLicker »

Offline jomebrew

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2015, 10:57:34 AM »
Yeah, like ML says.  Depends on how long it was from when you added the grain until you checked and saw it was 150 then how long the low heat took to raise all the mash above 170F.  Enzymes unfold at various temperatures.  Did you measure your gravity?   You will probably be a bit low and depending how much conversion was done, have a full bodied beer.

Offline darens1

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2015, 06:15:30 PM »
I'm guessing 35-45 minutes at 150-170 total then noticed the low flame but desired temps were history. OG was 1.04 about 20 hours after going in primary fermenter.

Offline darens1

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2015, 06:22:22 PM »
Normally with extract kits I see bubbling activity in the airlock within 24-36 hours or so after getting in the primary. Is this typical of all grain as well? Nothing is happening yet but the beer color is quite dark.

Offline jomebrew

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2015, 08:36:22 AM »
35-45 is plenty of time to 90% conversion.  1.040 means something good happened before the enzymes unfolded.  Activity at this point is all about O2 saturation, yeast cell count and yeast health.

Offline twhitaker

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Re: What happens when initial temperature in a all-grain gets too high.
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2015, 04:13:31 PM »
Occassionally when mine doesnt go right away, I  throw more yeast in there; sounds like the original pitch didnt work.
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