Author Topic: recipe for popular beers  (Read 3498 times)

Offline Anthony long

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recipe for popular beers
« on: January 08, 2017, 05:51:32 PM »
I'm a newbie and wanted to start simple, information overload happing. Lol  wondering if anyone had a list of recipes for popular American beers,I know it sounds stupid! I like Milwaukees best! I'd probably tweak it a bit down the road just wanting somewhere to start that don't take me to far away from my taste or lack of,Believe me I've had tons of others but still like it. Thanks!

Offline LBF

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Re: recipe for popular beers
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2017, 06:09:45 PM »
Milwaukee's Best? I might suggest dunking rice in carbonated water. It's about the same thing.

Seriously, if you want to drink stuff like Milwaukee's Best, homebrewing is probably not for you. In order to produce lagers along those lines, you'll need a lot of equipment and the time that goes into it, you'll spend more time and effort than it's worth.

Offline Oginme

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Re: recipe for popular beers
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2017, 05:45:16 AM »
You can search through the recipes on the BeerSmith web site for clone recipes.  Another site which has links to clone recipes is http://brewout.com/clone-brews/.

Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

KellerBrauer

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Re: recipe for popular beers
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2017, 06:36:40 AM »
Greetings Anthony - what I have done, while very rare, is simply google (or I prefer Bing) the beer name followed by the words "recipe clone". If there is a recipe out there, these search engines these days will find it.

Meantime, Millwaukees Best is a pilsner and pilsners are lagers and lagers need to ferment cold.  In fact, I brewed a German Pilsner Saturday and it's now fermenting in my kegerator at a steady 510F.  Once fermented, bottled and conditioned I'll return it to the kegerator and slowly bring the temp down to a final 350and I'll hold that for a few weeks.  So you will need some very specific equipment to successfully brew a lager.

Hope this information helps!

Good luck!
« Last Edit: January 09, 2017, 06:40:44 AM by KellerBrauer »