Author Topic: British Golden Ale  (Read 7001 times)

Offline MRMARTINSALES

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British Golden Ale
« on: September 12, 2017, 03:12:39 AM »
Hi,

Any thoughts on the attached recipe.

iM attempting a british golden ale, therefore ustilising british hops Fuggles and using Some US Cascade and fuggles late on.

Any thoughts or comments on how this may turn out or anybody experiences a similar recipe before?

Thanks

Offline Ck27

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2017, 03:24:56 AM »
Hi,

Any thoughts on the attached recipe.

iM attempting a british golden ale, therefore ustilising british hops Fuggles and using Some US Cascade and fuggles late on.

Any thoughts or comments on how this may turn out or anybody experiences a similar recipe before?

Thanks

I wouldn't use Cascade I would use instead of Fuggles east Kent Golding which is much better for most British styles and more traditional.

Offline MRMARTINSALES

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 03:27:02 AM »
Thanks for the tip.

Does that appear to be a good hop schedule non the less if i was to change cascade for East Kent Goldings

Regards

Offline Kevin58

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 10:12:40 AM »
A lot of people believe that Golden Ale arose in the 1980's but it has appeared in the Whitbread brewing records as early as the 1930's*. (they were classified in style as a pale ale) A recipe from the 1950's used only Goldings hops -- .75oz at 90 mins -- .75oz at 60 mins -- .75oz at 30 mins and 1oz dry hopped.

*Btw, here is an advert from 1868! that used the term "Golden Ale".


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Offline Ck27

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 10:13:34 AM »
Thanks for the tip.

Does that appear to be a good hop schedule non the less if i was to change cascade for East Kent Goldings

Regards

It would work, but Cascade is a fruity American hop it would pull out flavors not associated with English ales and seem way out of place honestly. I would also recommend buying distilled water and treating it with Burton water salts to get the best results as far as accurate water profile. I would also use a traditional English yeast maybe S-04 or Nottingham if you want to go liquid White Labs has a ton of good English yeast strains.

Offline MRMARTINSALES

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2017, 12:01:24 PM »
Thanks, so if I was to swap the cascade for east Kent goslings. Would that be a more appropriate hop schedule?

Offline Ck27

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2017, 12:38:58 PM »
Thanks, so if I was to swap the cascade for east Kent goslings. Would that be a more appropriate hop schedule?

EKG@60 mins
Fuggles@39 min
EKG@15
Fuggles@5

Offline willster89

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2017, 08:58:24 AM »
Hi OP, did the recipe work for you? I'd love to try so interested in your experience. The best British ale I tried was in Bristol. It was so good I instantly felt like buying a house in England and becoming a local farmer and brewer :D Though when I checked the prices afterwards https://tranio.com/united-kingdom/detached/ I thought I'd better stay where I belong  :o ;D

Offline BOB357

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Re: British Golden Ale
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2017, 10:00:47 AM »
Actually, American citrusy hops are common in this style and well within BJCP guidelines below:

Aroma: Hop aroma is moderately low to moderately high, and can use any variety of hops ? floral, herbal, or earthy English hops and citrusy American hops are most common. Frequently a single hop varietal will be showcased. Little to no malt aroma; no caramel. Medium-low to low fruity aroma from the hops rather than esters. Little to no diacetyl.
Appearance: Straw to golden in color. Good to brilliant clarity. Low to moderate white head. A low head is acceptable when carbonation is also low. Flavor: Medium to medium-high bitterness. Hop flavor is moderate to moderately high of any hop variety, although citrus flavors are increasingly common. Medium-low to low malt character, generally bready with perhaps a little biscuity flavor. Caramel flavors are typically absent. Little to no diacetyl. Hop bitterness and flavor should be pronounced. Moderately-low to low esters. Medium-dry to dry finish. Bitterness increases with alcohol level, but is always balanced. Mouthfeel: Light to medium body. Low to moderate carbonation on draught, although bottled commercial versions will be higher. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth, but this character should not be too high. Comments: Well-hopped, quenching beer with an emphasis on showcasing hops. Served colder than traditional bitters, this style was originally positioned as a refreshing summer beer, but is now often brewed year-round. Although early on the beers were brewed with English hops, increasingly American citrus-flavored hops are used. Golden Ales are also called Golden Bitters, Summer Ales, or British Blonde Ales. Can be found in cask, keg, and bottle.
Bob