Author Topic: Secondary  (Read 5674 times)

Offline ECarroll

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Secondary
« on: February 09, 2010, 09:47:51 AM »
Hi

I have a queston, i have been looking around on the board and i see a lot of  you talking about secondary Fermation, why do some of you do this, i mean what reasons? Over here in Germany we Homebrewers only do I Fermation and if you are like me always brewing Lagers, Pils, Export types of beers then it takes up to 7-10 days at around 46F and open Fermation, never have i had any problems with my beers. I just was wandering about the  2nd fermation and way?

Good brew
ECarroll

Offline MaltLicker

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 11:49:58 AM »
This may be a language/translation issue.  After your primary for lagers, do you "lager" them at 1C for 4-6 weeks to clarify them and drop the yeast to the bottom?  We would call that a type of secondary fermentation.  For ales, many people don't transfer the beer again until they keg or bottle it.  Some of us do transfer it to a secondary vessel before packaging it.  Reasons might include clarity, flavor conditioning for a high-gravity or complex beer, lack of space in the primary fermenting chest freezer, etc. 

"Secondary fermentation" is a loose term that could mean any type of additional settling time for the beer to clarify and/or improve its flavors.  The one constant would be that the beer has been transferred off the primary yeast. 

Offline ECarroll

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 12:47:42 PM »
OK i guess we are on the same sheet of paper, after my primary I bottle or keg them and leave at around 5C for up to 5-6 weeks

Offline stevemwazup

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 02:34:29 PM »
     Sometimes we put the beer in a secondary vessel to enhance certain flavors, like dry-hopping for an IPA,
or adding some vanilla beans, or bourbon to a stout.
By doing this, racking to a secondary vessel, it really helps to blend flavors together by giving it some added time to mingle together.
After such time, then we would bottle or keg.
stevemwazup

Offline CR

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2010, 08:14:21 PM »
because in the United States we do everything right and never make mistakes.


I thought every one knew that. 

Offline scaryeyes

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 06:19:39 PM »
Do anyone have experienced any bad yeast flavours if skipping the secondary? The last brews I just kept it in primary for like 2-3 weeks, and then bottled straight from the fermenter. I have started to put pieces of sugar in the bottles for carbonation. I skip several steps with the same result in taste and aroma. Ofcourse, the beer is not totally clear when cold, but I dont mind. Maybe after 6-8 more weeks beside the 4 weeks to carbonation, they get clear.
But I can just boil 10 litres at a time, so my batches are never that old.
Bewing: Corona clone
Upcoming: Noche Buena clone#6 attempt, Bohemia clasica clone #4 attempt

Offline BobBrews

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Re: Secondary
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2010, 09:38:24 AM »
BYO magizine did a recent article on leaving wort in the primary for extended time. The result was that most people preferred the beer left on the primary for extended times (4-5-6) weeks. It was more complex. The Yeast flavors were non-existant. I still (mostly) use a secondary but only to help in clearing the beer or to dry hop.
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