Author Topic: I don't normally worry about trub until  (Read 8571 times)

Offline Wildrover

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I don't normally worry about trub until
« on: December 08, 2008, 10:09:42 PM »
I move the beer to the secondary which is usually after about a week.  The reason I ask is because some of my lighter ales have a tea taste sometimes and I'm wondering if that might be because all those hops are left in the primary? 

Thoughts? 

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2008, 06:49:21 AM »
It sounds like you are experiencing problems with Acetaldehyde. Most people associate this with a grassy or green leaf flavors. Lighter Ales don't mask flavors well therefore they will be more noticeable or pronounced.
I move the beer to the secondary which is usually after about a week.
I doubt it's the trub! Most likely you are transferring off the yeast cake to soon, or its bacteria. It is not going to hurt anything to wait a few extra days or a week after the beer reaches its FG especially on lighter beers.

The Yeast is still active after the primary fermentation cleaning up after itself, Even though the beer has finished out. Lighter beers take more time to Condition.

You could however have a bacteria infection. Does the beer have a  sour note? If so it could point to a Lactic Acid Bacteria.

Either way, Cold conditioning for an extended time should mellow out the off flavors.

Cheers
Preston

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Offline Wildrover

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2008, 08:21:33 AM »
Preston,

No, I don't notice any sour notes.  You are probably right in that I'm moving the beer off the yeast too soon.  This is a relatively common problem with these beers and my process is also somewhat consistent, move the beer maybe a day after I stop seeing activity in the fermenter. 

Seems I need to keep it on there a few more days. 

Thanks for the help

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2008, 01:07:23 PM »
Preston,
No, I don't notice any sour notes.  You are probably right in that I'm moving the beer off the yeast too soon.  This is a relatively common problem with these beers and my process is also somewhat consistent, move the beer maybe a day after I stop seeing activity in the fermenter. 
Seems I need to keep it on there a few more days. 
Thanks for the help
WHAT! Are you referring to Airlock Activity? You know better than that!
Cheers
Preston
The woodpecker pecks, Not to annoy, But to survive!

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2008, 06:07:41 PM »
From what I've read trub isn't a factor worth considering unless you're brewing large batches, attributing a problem to the wrong cause, or in need of a bowel movement
My guess is that you're attributing a problem to the wrong cause.
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Offline Wildrover

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2008, 08:32:52 AM »
Preston,
No, I don't notice any sour notes.  You are probably right in that I'm moving the beer off the yeast too soon.  This is a relatively common problem with these beers and my process is also somewhat consistent, move the beer maybe a day after I stop seeing activity in the fermenter. 
Seems I need to keep it on there a few more days. 
Thanks for the help
WHAT! Are you referring to Airlock Activity? You know better than that!
Cheers
Preston

yeah Preston I'm afraid thats how I do it.  I don't have a spigot on my primary and I'm paranoid about opening it before its done to take the gravity reading.  So I usually give it a bunch of time look at the fluid inthe airlock to see when it balances out and then make decisions from there.  I should probably put the spigot in so I can take gravity readings but knowing me I would destroy the bucket in the process

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2008, 07:10:49 AM »
yeah Preston I'm afraid thats how I do it.  I don't have a spigot on my primary and I'm paranoid about opening it before its done to take the gravity reading.  So I usually give it a bunch of time look at the fluid in the airlock to see when it balances out and then make decisions from there.  I should probably put the spigot in so I can take gravity readings but knowing me I would destroy the bucket in the process
Three things that made making beer easier for me. Oxyclean, StarSan and a Wine Thief. I never liked the idea of a spigot either. Just something about 5 gallons of beer on the floor in the beer closet doesn't set right with me.
Cheers
Preston
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Offline Henway

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2008, 11:17:35 AM »
Three things that made making beer easier for me. Oxyclean, StarSan and a Wine Thief. I never liked the idea of a spigot either. Just something about 5 gallons of beer on the floor in the beer closet doesn't set right with me.
Cheers
Preston
I'm big on the conversion to cornies for everything.  Get a bunch of them.  They're cheaper than a carboy, not prone to breaking or sunlight damage.  They take up less floor space and are stackable.  I have a 2 year old barleywine that I can just take a glassful every once in a while without worrying about it.  If you have enough of them and enough beer in queue you don't have to rush fermenting.  If your process allows for little trub transfer then you can directly serve from the primary fermenter without even cutting the dip tube--you just throw out your first 2 glassfuls that have the trub and dead yeast in them.
Their only downside is you can't see the yeasties doing their business and their shape isn't optimal for the yeast.  Then again, I have a keggle that I can do a 11G batch in and I split it into a 8G plastic conical and a cornie (the cornie gets the first run wort with less hop break/trub--the conical doesn't mind the trub; it's easy to dump).  I haven't been able to detect a difference in taste yet.

Offline Wildrover

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2008, 11:41:21 AM »

Three things that made making beer easier for me. Oxyclean, StarSan and a Wine Thief. I never liked the idea of a spigot either. Just something about 5 gallons of beer on the floor in the beer closet doesn't set right with me.
Cheers
Preston

What's a wine thief?

Offline MaltLicker

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2008, 07:46:01 AM »
http://www.ebrew.com/test_equipment/wine_thieves.htm

It is a plastic tube specially made for "stealing" a small sample from a vessel.  Depending on your requirements for length and sample size, you could also use a racking cane or the plastic tube of a bottling wand.  (For a refractometer, literally drops will work; a hydro tube may take four oz.) 

Offline SOGOAK

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2008, 04:11:43 PM »
This is on my mind as the next thing to do properly.  I have been just brewing by airlock or by time.  Then I get sugary beer that didn't finish out.  After a month extra in bottles it is good, but I might as well bulk condition.

So I'm thinking Turkey baster.  Then I was thinking about just using a racking hose and thumb.  I wouldn't put the sample back. 

Either way, I need to start using the hydrometer and stop winging it. :P
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Offline Rep

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Re: I don't normally worry about trub until
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2008, 05:06:40 AM »
This is on my mind as the next thing to do properly.  I have been just brewing by airlock or by time.  Then I get sugary beer that didn't finish out.  After a month extra in bottles it is good, but I might as well bulk condition.

So I'm thinking Turkey baster.  Then I was thinking about just using a racking hose and thumb.  I wouldn't put the sample back. 

Either way, I need to start using the hydrometer and stop winging it. :P

One of the things most home brewers strive for is consistency.  Once your procedures, equipment and ingredients are consistent you can begin predicting outcomes.

From there you can gain confidence that the pale ale you liked so much six months ago will be replicated when you brew it tomorrow.

A hydrometer is a major tool to use in this process.

 

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