Brewing Topics > Cider, Mead, Wine and Others

Mead versus Est ABV

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mr_beer:
I am puzzled.

Attached is a recipe "xxMead" which is Mr. Smith's recipe that I got from the cloud and fiddled with to localize it to my environment.

On the Design tap it shows an ABV of 15%.  I increased the Honey to 30 poiunds the Ext. ABV did not change.  Increased it to 40 pounds and the Est ABV did not change. 

The OG changes but nothing related to Est ABV.  If I increase the fermentation a lot I expect that the Est. ABV will change correspondingly. 

Am I using this tool improperly??

There must be something I am missing here.

Oginme:
Yes,  what you are missing is that with the release of BS3 the program uses the maximum alcohol tolerance of the yeast as a cap to how much a given wort/must can ferment.  If you want to work around this limitation (which is published by the yeast manufacturers), then you can edit the yeast and increase the max alcohol tolerance for that yeast in the recipe.  your results, however, can only be validated by actual readings on your brew.

mr_beer:
Thank you for the prompt reply.

Apparently the program was changed but it was not important to change the documentation.

The program is great with lots of capabilities.  It is a shame that the documentation is so sparce and often non-existent on many program options.

I would give the program an A- but give the documentation a D.

dtapke:
What documentation would need to change? it seems the issue is that you're not familiar with the ingredients you chose. That yeast has an alcohol tolerance of 14%, therefore achieving an estimated ABV higher that 15% would be impossible. The program reflected that.

It sounds more like an issue of the user not understanding how fermentation works, the program cannot account for the user being unaware of what they're doing, and no documentation can account for that either. The program does not teach one how to brew, it expects that a user is competent and understands the dynamics of brewing...

dtapke:
sorry my short temper there....

the issue is, if they upped fermentation to levels beyond what the yeast can handle then everyone would want to know why their beer/mead/cider fermentation stopped right? like, "i made this mead recipe for 25% alcohol, why did it only ferment to 15% ABV?"

so by limiting the recipe to the ability of the ingredients, he's effectively prevented this level of stupid, yet instead brought on a whole other level of problems with people saying "why can't i make a recipe that's 50% ABV?"

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