Author Topic: Jamils Mini Mash Process  (Read 4201 times)

Offline SleepySamSlim

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Jamils Mini Mash Process
« on: April 05, 2009, 11:54:11 PM »
Anyone out there tried this pretty simple stove top method for partial mashing ? Its in the book "Brewing Classic Styles"  pages 293-296.  Looks very straight forward - but I want to correctly create a mash profile for BeerSmith. I took a shot at it by converting one of my extract clone recipes to partial mash using the BeerSmith recipe conversion function. I then created a new mas profile ala Jamil --- but some of the fields / terms are not clear to me. Any help / comment would be appreciated
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Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Jamils Mini Mash Process
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2009, 06:22:10 AM »
SSS
I was looking at your PM for the Fat Tire and I had a question. Maybe it would be more evident to me, it i had my book with me. Anyhow, I was looking at the Mash profile and I don't understand what step #2 is for. I understand that step is for conversion of the unmodified malts, but if you are already at the desired temp (ie:155F) then why is step 2 needed.

If you are trying to do a mash out, then the temp should be around 165 to turn off the enzymes and stop conversion.

Cheers
Preston
The woodpecker pecks, Not to annoy, But to survive!

Offline SleepySamSlim

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Re: Jamils Mini Mash Process
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2009, 09:14:35 PM »
Good point - Let summarize Jamil's process

Step One:
-put grains in a large mesh bag and tie-off

Step Two
-use the ratio of 1.5 quarts per pound of grist
-heat the water to 165deg
-lower bag into water - use spoon move grain/bag to ensure all grain is covered
-with addition of grain water temp should drop to 150-155deg
-cover and let sit 30 min

Step Three
-check mash temperature
-add heat to bring back to 155deg
-let sit for another 30min

Place 2 gallons of water in your wort boiling pot and bring it to 165deg

Step Four
-after final 30min. lift bag out of mash pot and let drain for a minute
-now dip grain bag in 165deg water in wort pot and let sit 10 min
-lift grain bag let drain and set aside
-pour liquid from mash pot into wort pot


Now proceed with the extract recipe (assuming you've already made corrections for a partial mash) -- boil - add extract(s) - hops etc

So that is pretty much straight from Jamil's / John Palmers book - section called mini-mashing. Again my desire here is to correctly model this for BeerSmith as I'm a noob on all this mashing lingo. Thats also why my "mashing" section in the attached recipe has 2 steps ---- Step one for the first 30min    Step two for the re-heat and second 30min

Any help / comments appreciated.  I'm going to try this very soon on a Red Ale
« Last Edit: April 07, 2009, 09:16:30 PM by SleepySamSlim »
Some people tell you the old walkin' blues ain't bad
Worst old feelin' that I've ever had ...
-Robert Johnson

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Jamils Mini Mash Process
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 09:15:26 AM »
I was digging through my book last night and that's pretty much is how they explain it. Your mash steps are correct per your recipe. A single sparge round would be sufficient for the amount of grains in your recipe. If you wanted to split the sparge, there should be enough water to do so.

Good luck

Cheers
Preston
The woodpecker pecks, Not to annoy, But to survive!

Offline SleepySamSlim

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Re: Jamils Mini Mash Process
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2009, 11:55:57 PM »
Thanks for looking over my shoulder Preston --- I'll be brewing this weekend !
Some people tell you the old walkin' blues ain't bad
Worst old feelin' that I've ever had ...
-Robert Johnson