Author Topic: Do I really need acidulated malt?  (Read 3918 times)

Offline Wildrover

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 480
Do I really need acidulated malt?
« on: June 14, 2009, 11:38:52 AM »
I have a recipe that one of the owners of the local brewpub gave me to make one of their beers at home.  It calls for a very small percentage of acidualted malt.  If I'm using ph 5.2 do I really need this malt?  I don't think my LHBS carries this? 

thanks

WR

Offline MaltLicker

  • Global Moderator
  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2004
    • Blue Ribbon Brews
Re: Do I really need acidulated malt?
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2009, 06:20:26 PM »
I can't say whether you NEED it, but I did learn that small amounts will move the pH more than I expected. 

In a kolsch, I used 1.45% and that, plus the water chemistry adjustments took my pH to 5.0 or so, if I recall. 

Since the pub is local, you may ask if they also adjust the local water in any way, or if the acid malt is substituting for water chemicals.  My understanding of the 5.2 product is that it is a buffer, designed to keep your mash pH in the desired range, but if the mash is way off of 5.2, will it physically move the mash pH very much?  Dunno. 

Offline Wildrover

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 480
Re: Do I really need acidulated malt?
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2009, 06:40:27 AM »
Maltlicker,


Thanks for the response, I probably will just skip it and make the recipe without it.  My experience with the Ph 5.2 is that it moves the mash right there.  Of course the water I use isn't that far out to begin with.

From what I've read about the acidualted malt, is that it serves the same purpose as the 5.2 in that it helps to bring the ph to a certain place and since I haven't had any real problems with that I think I feel good just skipping it all together. 

Having said that, I also believe the lactic acid may have a souring effect which, if desired, may be appropriate but the beer I'm making is an amber with no real evidence of a sour note.

 

modification