Poll

When Do I know to Bottle?

Now
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When the yeast stops bubbling
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Voting closed: July 27, 2009, 11:33:34 PM

Author Topic: When is the yeast done?  (Read 3221 times)

The New Guy

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When is the yeast done?
« on: July 20, 2009, 11:33:34 PM »
My yeast has been active for 9 days and it states to ferment for 7!
The bubbles are popping up every 11 seconds or so. It has been the same for the last 3 days.
Any suggestions?

Adamsale

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Re: When is the yeast done?
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 02:32:22 AM »
7 days will be OK if the temp is stable at what it says on the packet and what yeast you are using. Ale or lager.  The best and only way is to take an SG reading with a Hydrometer. If they are the same 2 days in a row then its OK to bottle. They should be around 1008 to 1012 depending on what you have put in. The bubbler will probably be still bubbling due to the brew warming up and expanding and releasing some of the CO2 blanket through it...
Hope that helps..

Offline MaltLicker

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  • Posts: 2004
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Re: When is the yeast done?
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 06:13:08 AM »
Welcome aboard to the hobby and forum.............specific to your question, hydrometer readings are the most reliable.  Visually, you'd want the airlock to be quiet for at least 60 seconds between burps.  Then you'd confirm with a hydro.  If the beer is causing a burp every 11 seconds then it's still fermenting and creating CO2.  (And if you bottled, you might create explosive bottle bombs as ferm continued in the confined space of the bottle.) 

If you have time, you could search here on bottling or fermentation and see people's opinion.  I'd also recommend you buy Palmer's How to Brew - it's a great book for any home brewer.  You can read abbreviated sections online.  Chapter 8 is about fermentation.  You'll read that ferm time is highly variable.  Generally, more problems arise from rushing to bottle than by waiting a few extra days or a week. 

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8.html