Author Topic: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help  (Read 4490 times)

CCA258

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I am new to brewing and I just finished bottling my first Amber Ale batch. It has been 2 days since I bottled, I went to my basement to check on my beer and discovered that when I hold the bottle up to the light a dark layer of milky sedement lines the bottom of the bottle. When I turn the bottle upside down, the sedement kinda floats throughout the bottle.

Is this normal?

If not, is it a problem?

How do I fix this problem for my next batch?

Thank you

Offline SleepySamSlim

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Re: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2009, 12:20:32 AM »
May need to send a pic for us to look at

It is very normal for a thin layer of creamy colored material to form on the bottom of bottles - basically a yeast layer. But forming after just 2 days sounds weird --- I would expect that at 2 weeks in the bottle. However if you had a lot of sediment in the batch and perhaps only did Primary fermentation - this might be normal.

As usual patience is the key leave them at room temperature for 2 weeks (and stop turning them upside down). After 2 weeks take on beer chill it in the fridge and try a taste test.
Some people tell you the old walkin' blues ain't bad
Worst old feelin' that I've ever had ...
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Ten Lips Brewery

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Re: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2009, 12:24:39 AM »
This is probably yeast that has settled to the bottom of the bottle.  When you racked from your fermenter to the bottle there was still yeast in suspension in the fermenter, and you added disolved sugar to the beer before bottling.  The yeast will consume the added sugar to give you carbonation and some will settle to the bottom of the bottle just like it did during fermentation.  If there is more sediment in some bottles than others you a) didn't have a good thurough mix before bottling, or b) during bottling pulled some trub from the bottom of the fermenter into your bottles.

really not a problem, just watch your pour when serving and stop before you get to the bottom of the bottle

Hope this helps

CCA258

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Re: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2009, 09:17:05 AM »
Thank you for your help guys.

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2009, 09:13:30 AM »
The only thing I would add, is to check the tops of the bottle for a ring or spots. If you see a ring, or spots/dots, you may have an infection. If you do see either, check all your bottles. If they all have them, the infection occurred before bottling. If only a few have them, then the infection came from bottling.

Cheers
Preston
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tonymaud

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Re: Rookie Brewer Has milky like sedement in bottles... Need some help
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2009, 07:09:54 AM »
Did you do a two stage fermentation or just a single stage? 2 stage will help clear up the beer better. Use irish moss or Whirflock tables at the end of your boil to cause the protiens in the wort to coagulate and fall out of suspension before going into your fermentor.  Also, using a immersion chiller to quickly cool your wort will aid in a cold break.  Gently whirlpool your wort in the kettle and let it set covered 20 minutes or so to let this break and hop material  fall out. Then be careful not to suck it up when going to the fermentor.  You may have also sucked up some of the sediment when you racked to the bottling bucket.  What you may be seeing is this sediment re-settling to the bottom of the bottles.  When transferring from one vessel to another, do so quietly, being careful not to stir up any of the stuff at the bottom and leave as much of it behind as possible.  As mentioned in the previous posts, it is normal in bottle conditioned homebrews to have a sediment layer in the bottles.  This is the residual yeast created during the carbonation process.  I hope this helps 

 

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