Author Topic: Table sugar in a yeast starter  (Read 27054 times)

Offline clef

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Table sugar in a yeast starter
« on: December 25, 2009, 03:54:44 AM »
Would it be OK to use table sugar instead of DME in a yeast starter, or would it end up giving off flavors.  Just curious I haven't ever used a starter and was thinking about it.  I always have table sugar around havent bought DME in awhile. 

Offline sickbrew

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2009, 11:24:15 AM »
That's a negative on the table sugar.

You want to prepare the yeasties for the ensuing battle and the best way to train them is by using a starter that is close in composition to the beer you are making.

I use Dry Malt Extract (DME) added to boiling water at the correct amount to achieve a gravity close to my brew.

Lastly, cool, aerate and then pitch.

cheers

Offline ChuckE

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2009, 07:25:36 AM »
You *could* use table sugar for the yeast starter, but it wouldn't do your yeast any good.
The off flavor is less of an issue than the training of the yeast to prefer table sugar.

Think of it this way; you have small children and only feed them Skittles and Snicker-bars. When they get to be teen-agers, you move them into a new environment and expect them to eat rye bread, boiled chicken and broccoli. They're not going to run to the dinner table.

Offline clef

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2009, 08:27:38 AM »
Ok, just thought I would ask since the sugar is always here and the DME is not.  I'll just have to pick up a package of it next time I'm at my LHBS. 

Thanks for the Information.

Offline VonMessa

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2009, 07:00:16 AM »
You can always collect some of your runnings and freeze them.  It won't help with this batch, but for subsequent batches, it would help.  Just thaw out a wort-sicle and pitch.  If your next batch is going to be a higher gravity, you can always add more DME to compensate.
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Offline SOGOAK

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2009, 05:51:57 AM »
+1 on extra runnings for starters.  Not only saves money and is more fermentable that extract, but it is easier too.  That and becoming a yeast rancher have really helped me.
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Offline MaltLicker

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2009, 10:37:47 AM »
I have mason jars and lids.  Is the only other thing needed for this a s/s canning pot? 

Offline CR

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2010, 02:06:56 PM »
you can use the converted wort  as your starter.
It's a fine propagation medium, it's already what's in your beer, and you already have plenty of it.
You really don't need anything more.


I have used pure  corn sugar as a supplement to the wort, but I have it around as I use it when I bottle.

Offline McCuckerson

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2010, 08:35:08 PM »
You *could* use table sugar for the yeast starter, but it wouldn't do your yeast any good.
The off flavor is less of an issue than the training of the yeast to prefer table sugar.

Think of it this way; you have small children and only feed them Skittles and Snicker-bars. When they get to be teen-agers, you move them into a new environment and expect them to eat rye bread, boiled chicken and broccoli. They're not going to run to the dinner table.
You just made my stomach turn by mentioning 'boiled chicken'

Offline CE

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2010, 10:12:42 PM »
I've thought about collecting my second or third runnings for a starter but never have. So is there enough sugar left after I collect all I need for my batch to make a starter? I was thinking that a starter needed to be around 1.040...are the runnings really that high? I've never measured. I'd definitely like not to waste that.

Offline ghwren

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2010, 06:23:51 AM »
Some of the other boards reference the "Crabtree Effect" where in the presence of above a low threshold of malt, the yeast begin to concentrate on ethanol instead of biomass. Here's a reported quote from Dr White:

"To really eliminate the crabtree effect, you need to be down under 1.010, and slowly feed the yeast sugar.  But 1.025-30 is still a good range, and I think it is a good compromise to good yeast physiology and good fermentation.  So I think that is the best gravity."

We as homebrewers don't have the means to remove ethanol from our starters or the patience to slowly feed our yeast to get the most cell growth.
So, I'm going to start collecting my last runnings, boil it down to 1.025 or add enough DME to get there.I already have the mason jars and pressure cooker, so this should be easy.

Offline Bootlegbrewer

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Re: Table sugar in a yeast starter
« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2010, 05:22:00 PM »
yes it is very easy, I have been yeast ranching for almost 10 years and now whenever I get a batch that has more than 10 gallons after the boil I place the left over wort in mason jars, put them in my pressure cooker for 20 minutes, then take them out and apply my canning lids. I now have yeast starters just sitting in sterile jars ready to use when I need them.

There is quite a bit of info on yeast ranching and it really is quite easy, I have not had any bad beers from the yeast I have cultured.

I am actually really surprised more people don't do it. I asked about yeast ranchers in my home brew club here in Charlotte and I was told not many of them do it. This is a real surprise to me because it was one of the first things I looked into after brewing for a few years and looking for ways to cut down costs and basically just nerd out more on homebrewing.

If you are interested at all in yeast ranching I say go for it!

 

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