Author Topic: Kegging, aging question  (Read 5226 times)

Offline kcreiglow

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Kegging, aging question
« on: January 31, 2012, 07:09:45 PM »
So I have been bottling my brews for awhile and I have found that my beer will be fully carbonated in about 3 weeks.  However, they always taste "green" to me.  If I wait a few more weeks they taste spot on!
So, I am moving to kegging.  My question is...  If I keg a beer and carbonate it within a few days will it be really green tasting still or not?  I have seen force carbing where you can drink your beer within a few hours, but i don't think I would enjoy it if it didn't taste optimal.  I know that quickly carbing your beer with kegging is a plus.  What does the majority do, and how does it taste?
I figure if I want to have my optimal beer taste I would slowly carb in the keg then let it sit for a few weeks prior to drinking.  So, am I missing something.  Is kegging and quickly carbing my beer with kegs and C02 make everything quicker and better?  Is that why people rave about kegging?

Thanks for your input everyone!

Offline jomebrew

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2012, 12:59:21 PM »
force carbonating means you can drink your beer sooner but does not mean it does not need the same conditioning time.  Since you can crash and carbonate at the same time you can enjoy a bit of cold crashed affects sooner.   That is probably just a  little clearer beer with less floating things though.

I starting drinking my beers as soon as I can and enjoy them as they get better with age then curse them when they run dry.  There is a bit more mystery in kegged beers since you are never sure when you will blow it out unlike pulling the last bottle off the shelf.

Offline ArtCox

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2012, 01:25:59 PM »
I have had beers that I didn't like after a week or 2 in the keg, then tried them a month or 2 later and they were perfect.   

Offline piper55

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2012, 03:50:25 PM »
 I always force carbonate then back the pressure off to about 3 or 4 psi and let it sit around. I think it will age quicker to because you arent going back into fermentation by adding wort or sugar to it. I find by kegging you are about 2 weeks ahead of bottling.

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2012, 04:16:18 PM »
What jomebrew said.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline doorway

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2012, 04:55:50 PM »
Keep enough in the pipeline so when  keg 1 runs dry you just gas up keg 2 at dispensing pressure.  when you have thoroughly abused keg 1 til empty, keg 2 will be waiting.  dont rush it...there's always plenty more where that came from.

Offline kcreiglow

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2012, 10:31:13 PM »
Thanks for the insight everyone.  I like the idea of drinking one brew while the other is carbed and still conditioning.  I will have a two keg system, but that was so I had options.  So I'm thinking if i bought another keg I could hook it up force carb then un-hook it from the system and let it sit until one of the two other brews run dry?
Anyone know the specifics on how that is done?  Does it have to stay in the fridge?

Thanks again,

Offline jomebrew

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Re: Kegging, aging question
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2012, 09:49:22 AM »
So I'm thinking if i bought another keg I could hook it up force carb then un-hook it from the system and let it sit until one of the two other brews run dry?
Anyone know the specifics on how that is done?  Does it have to stay in the fridge?

That is what I used to do.  I keep them both cold (force carbonation works faster at cold temperatures).  Once carbonated, I only give the kegs low pressure to keep pushing the beer.  I drank form both kegs and moved the CO2 connector back and forth.

Now I have a 4 port manifold with backflow prevention valves.  I can carbonate 4 kegs at the same time.  Yay!