Author Topic: Water profile tool?  (Read 3666 times)

Offline icarussound

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Water profile tool?
« on: October 26, 2012, 04:40:17 AM »
The water profile tool seems like it is geared for boil volume rather than mash volume - which is it? So additions would go into the mash *and* sparge or just mash (if mash)?


TIA!

Offline bperetto

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Re: Water profile tool?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2012, 01:03:43 PM »
I personally put mine in both the mash and sparge.  If you're modeling say, dublin water- do they use different water in the mash and sparge? No- they use dublin water, period.  That's how I've always approached it.

So, when I add the water to my recipe, I add the amount of water equal to the total water needed (say 9 gal), not the final batch size (5 gal).
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Offline tom_hampton

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Re: Water profile tool?
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2012, 09:03:27 PM »
The water profile tool seems like it is geared for boil volume rather than mash volume - which is it? So additions would go into the mash *and* sparge or just mash (if mash)?


TIA!

Divide your additions into two based on the percentage of the total water in the mash, and the sparge. I add my MASH salts to my grain while its still in the grain bag from the LHBS.  That way it stirs into the mash directly with the grain.  The "sparge" additions should go directly into the boil kettle after the sparge is over. 

The "sparge" additions don't usually disolve well in plain water.  Some of the additions need the lower pH of wort in order to help everything dissolve.  The sparge doesn't need the chemistry of the salts...so, just put them in the kettle after it comes to a boil.  The only exception to that rule that I make is acid. 

Due to my local water, if I'm making a beer with an SRM below 10, then I need to acidify my sparge water to keep the mash pH from rising above 5.8.  I add the lactic acid directly to the HLT. 

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