Author Topic: Mash Out  (Read 4603 times)

Offline john thorn

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Mash Out
« on: December 15, 2012, 01:00:33 PM »
I am all grain brewing now having done about 5 batches using that approach. I see conflicting information regarding the value of a mash-out and in fact Beersmith says its not needed with the exception a few instances. In Beersmith, if i try to add a mash-out step to make a 5 gallon batch using the 10 gallon cooler system, the qty of boiling water to be added at that point to hit 170 F is so high I could never boil it off in any reasonable amount of time unless I cut the mash-in and sparge water volumes drastically. Anyone have any thoughts on the mash-out in general and how to use beer smith for this if I am doing something wrong? Thanks in advance...

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2012, 03:53:32 PM »
I have found that mashing out greatly increases my efficiency.
Instead of adding hot water I use the decoction method where I remove an eyeballed third of the mash, bring it to a steady boil, then mix it back in.
This generally results in the entire mash being raised to the neighborhood of 170 degrees.
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Offline gtreloquence

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2012, 10:07:55 AM »
http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/12/22/beer-brewing-myths-holiday-episode-beersmith-podcast-29/

I like John Palmer's answer in this Beersmith podcast. He mentions how a lot of home brew techniques are derived from the commercial brewing industry where consistency is more important than in home brewing. For the big guys, transferring the wort from the mash to the lauter tun can take some time and may allow further enzymatic activity, potentially affecting the finished product. Therefor they perform the mash out step to halt the activity. In the podcast the general consensus is that for home brewing the mash out isn't necessary for most batches. I am still extract brewing due to lack of room for an all grain set up so I can't personally share any experience but this explanation stood out in my mind. Just thought I'd share.

Offline bucknut

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2012, 02:12:28 PM »
I would't think you need to do a mash out if your doing a sparge, someone correct me if I wrong, but if you batch sparge, your going to be raising your grain bed temp to near 170 degrees and then draining, if your doing a continuous sparge I think the same would apply. I do no-sparge brewing so  :-\

Offline john thorn

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2012, 05:01:12 PM »
Thanks to everyone who responded. More input to consider and work with!

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2012, 10:50:11 PM »
I have found that mashing out greatly increases my efficiency.
Instead of adding hot water I use the decoction method where I remove an eyeballed third of the mash, bring it to a steady boil, then mix it back in.
This generally results in the entire mash being raised to the neighborhood of 170 degrees.

I bet the increase efficiency is due to the decoction exploding the grains rather than the "mash out".   Splitting hairs, perhaps.
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Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Mash Out
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2012, 03:11:27 PM »
Quote
I bet the increase efficiency is due to the decoction exploding the grains rather than the "mash out".

I thought it was because the heat made the sugars more easily washed off the grain, but I could be wrong. 
Either way it's how the makers of some of my favorite commercial brews do it, and it works, so why fix it?
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson