Author Topic: Tastin' Yeasty  (Read 5122 times)

Offline beernbourbon

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Tastin' Yeasty
« on: December 22, 2012, 08:11:56 PM »
OK, so after a couple batches, started with extract, moved on to partial extract, would like to move on to full grain, but.... I've noticed one constant in all batches I've made so far. Every one of them has a slight 'yeasty' "after taste". It's not overly offensive, but I can taste it. Is it normal? I'm pouring very carefully, leaving a bit in the bottle....I've even tried just pouring a little bit into a glass, then tasting. Always the same. If this is normal, well then ok, it's just something I'll deal with. However, I have a sneaking suspicion, it is not normal. How do I fix it? I've followed all directions and recipes to a "T", cleaned and sanitized everything religiously with appropriate chemicals to make sure no odd tastes enter..... what am I, the ever vigilant newbie, doing wrong? I would like that wonderful tasty brew to be smooth and clean on the palate, and I refuse to move on to the big boy's playground of full grain fun until I resolve this issue... ;D
Primary 1: Nada
Primary 2: Zip
Primary 3: Zilch
Aging: Four hops 60 min IPA #3, #4, #5
Fridge/drinking:Chocolate Milk Stout, Four Hops #1, #2, Bunny Banger 90 min IPA #1, #2, Mowin Down a Thirst,
Next up: Headin' for stout season....

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2012, 10:35:30 PM »
You didn't mention anything about your fermentation.  What beers have you made, what yeasts did you use, and whatttemperature did you ferment at?  How did you clarify the beer (cold crash)?   

Fermenting is everything.  Almost nothing else matters. It's all about the yeast.   If youare the ttypical new brewer, you care probably making ales with kits, that may have a dry yeast pack.  You may sprinkle the dry yeast directly ontothe wort and set the bucket in a coolish corner of the house.

The yeasty flavor comes from either very young beer, or poor fermentation, or both.    As general advice:

1.  Use good quality yeast. Often the yeast in kits is substandard, or old.  I would buy fresh liquid yeast, and throw them dry packets away...unless you know the kit yeast is good. Tell us what you used.

2.  Rehydrate the yeast in sterile water, don't sprinkle directly onto the wort. 1/2 of the yeast is killed instantly when youdo tthat. Dead yeast impart undesirable flavors.

3.  keep your fermenting beer cool. The beer should be around 68. But, fermenting beer is generally about 2-5 degrees hotter than the air. So, ideally you want it in a room around 64 or so.

4.  After fermentation is complete let it settle and clear for at least 1 week at room temperature, or 3 days at refrigerator temps before bottling.

5.  If you are using priming sugar... After it is carbonated, put the beer in the fridge for two weeks to allow all of the yeast to fully settle out.

Tell us more about how you are doing things and we can provide more specific advice.

R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline beernbourbon

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2012, 07:15:06 PM »
You didn't mention anything about your fermentation.  What beers have you made, what yeasts did you use, and whatttemperature did you ferment at?  How did you clarify the beer (cold crash)?   


Fermenting is everything.  Almost nothing else matters. It's all about the yeast.   If youare the ttypical new brewer, you care probably making ales with kits, that may have a dry yeast pack.  You may sprinkle the dry yeast directly ontothe wort and set the bucket in a coolish corner of the house.

The yeasty flavor comes from either very young beer, or poor fermentation, or both.    As general advice:

1.  Use good quality yeast. Often the yeast in kits is substandard, or old.  I would buy fresh liquid yeast, and throw them dry packets away...unless you know the kit yeast is good. Tell us what you used.

2.  Rehydrate the yeast in sterile water, don't sprinkle directly onto the wort. 1/2 of the yeast is killed instantly when youdo tthat. Dead yeast impart undesirable flavors.

3.  keep your fermenting beer cool. The beer should be around 68. But, fermenting beer is generally about 2-5 degrees hotter than the air. So, ideally you want it in a room around 64 or so.

4.  After fermentation is complete let it settle and clear for at least 1 week at room temperature, or 3 days at refrigerator temps before bottling.

5.  If you are using priming sugar... After it is carbonated, put the beer in the fridge for two weeks to allow all of the yeast to fully settle out.

Tell us more about how you are doing things and we can provide more specific advice.

Ok, the Beers made have been 2 batches from Mr. Beer....I don't count those, those just got me interested.
Then I made from a 'kit' a Boston Lager with a dry packet sprinkled on top when cooled to 72 degrees. Fermented for over 2 weeks in the basement (but not on the concrete floor, elevated on a shelf/platform)at 64 to 68 degrees, then bottled with the corn sugar. Left to age for 2 weeks in the same place. Refrigerated at somewhere around 38 degrees for 3 days, then tried it. Was a bit 'fizzy' I think I know why on that, probably not done fermenting or a bit too much sugar.
Next came a Fat Tire Ale clone kit that was a mix of LME, DME, and grains in a bag. This one, I re-hydrated the yeast prior to incorporation into the wort. Same fermentation, bottling, etc.
I have since started recording my OG and FG readings, to ensure completion in the primary, so my Chocolate Milk Stout has had a bit more 'care' taken. However that one just got bottled so I won't know until late January how it turned out. Thing is, this one had a dry yeast packet as well.
I know about ZERO when it comes to picking yeasts, let alone asking for a liquid yeast. Trying to learn more about that, but just SO much to it!  :)
Oh....the "cold crashing"? I have yet to find anything that can define that for me....help?

So, back to being a bit more patient? Once my readings confirm fermentation is complete, I should just let it sit for another week? Yer killin' me!!
And then I have to look at it in the fridge for yet ANOTHER 2 weeks before I can pop the top???? You speak such foulness!!!  ;D

Ok, so the next batch might be another stout...... Oatmeal I think. I'm not ready for all grain, equipment nor knowledge.... so I will be doing the LME grain mix.... what yeast should I be using for this? Beersmith has so many choices, I couldn't begin to know which to pick. My beer supply store has many in stock....but there just seems to be something about them I don't feel comfortable with. They kinda poo poo'd the idea of a secondary for my stouts, even though everywhere else I read seems to think it's a good idea....so I'm kinda like...hmmmm..
Am i just way over my head for now? My issue is that I don't particularly care for lighter beers...they are OK, I just prefer Imperial, sweet and regular stouts and porters...so I kind of feel compelled to get to brewin' what I like...
Primary 1: Nada
Primary 2: Zip
Primary 3: Zilch
Aging: Four hops 60 min IPA #3, #4, #5
Fridge/drinking:Chocolate Milk Stout, Four Hops #1, #2, Bunny Banger 90 min IPA #1, #2, Mowin Down a Thirst,
Next up: Headin' for stout season....

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2012, 11:16:01 PM »
Patience helps... But, a little planning can help to.

Cold crashing is bringinthe bulk beer down tto refrigerator temps to put the yeast to sleep and get them to settle out.

Now that you are rehydrating the yeast, I don't see anything wrong with your fermentation to cause yeasty flavor.  I think your just suffering from the typical newbie impatience.  :-) green beer tastes green (yeasty).   

But, you can do better with a different yeast. I think newbies do better with English yeasts. They ferment fast, and they clear fast without needing to be cold crashed. Wlp002 is classic choice, but I also like wlp005,and 007.   007 Attenuates a little better, so I'd go with that as a general purpose yeast. You could make just about any beer with that yeast.   

As far as recipes go, get brewing classic styles, by jamil zainachef and John Palmer. Also you should get "how to brew"  by John Palmer. Bcs has 80+ recipes that have all won medals in competition.  You can't go wrong. I'mccurrentlyworking my way through brewing every recipe in the book.

If you don't have the patience to wait, then brew more beer.  Note my signature, I have 9 batches in various stages of fermenting, aging, drinking.   Eventually you will have more beer than you can drink.



R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2012, 08:55:37 AM »
I do agree that your problem is likely green beer, or perhaps the yeast that came with the kit didn't settle out that well. That's something I like about Fermentis Safale US-05 ale yeast. After a quick fermentation it settles out like a champ. Yesterday I started a lager using Fermentis Saflager 23. It's bubbling away nicely.

I would consider using liquid yeast for something specialized, like a cider or a Belgian (Fat Tire is a Belgian, right?), but for most everything else Fermentis packets work fine for me.

As far as all-grain goes, I would recommend looking into it. The quality difference is night and day. As far as equipment investment goes, you don't have to spend a lot.  Look up "brew in a bag" (BIAB) on this site. 

Besides, grain is cheaper. That lager I started yesterday cost me about twenty bucks in total ingredients (it also helps that I buy base grain and hops in bulk). Compare that to an extract kit.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline beernbourbon

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2012, 11:05:37 AM »
Awesome guys! Sounds like I just need to get to brewin'!!! Oh, darn.  ;D

Thanks for the yeast lessons.... I think my Chocolate Milk Stout was the one I used the Safale yeast with, so we shall see.

Believe me, I have been looking into the all grain, it's a mite intimidating to me though, the ability to change the entire structure and taste of a beer by not even changing ingredients, just the amount of one ingredient. Ultimately I want to create an Imperial I can call mine, and model it after some of the Nordic porters/stouts...I'm still doing the research on that one.

Oh, and I have been looking for Palmers 'How to Brew'....local brew stores nor book stores have it, so I'll be ordering it later this week, once all the holiday Hoo Ha has settled.

Anyway, thanks so much guys, a sincerely appreciate the help, and I'll keep you posted!

Merry Christmas and Happy Brewing to all!!!
Primary 1: Nada
Primary 2: Zip
Primary 3: Zilch
Aging: Four hops 60 min IPA #3, #4, #5
Fridge/drinking:Chocolate Milk Stout, Four Hops #1, #2, Bunny Banger 90 min IPA #1, #2, Mowin Down a Thirst,
Next up: Headin' for stout season....

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2012, 07:20:10 AM »
Quote
I have been looking into the all grain, it's a mite intimidating

Grind grain. Heat water. Mix together in an insulated container. Adjust the temp. Walk away for an hour or so while the enzymes do the work.

Wash sugars off grain (sparge).

At this point you have sugary water, hops, and a boil pot. You know what to do.

All-grain is that easy.

Merry Christmas!
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline beernbourbon

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Re: Tastin' Yeasty
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2012, 05:30:18 AM »
LOL...ya make it sound so easy! Brother in Law is an Amber Bock drinker, maybe I'll turn him into my lab rat!
I GOTTA get Palmers book.... hmmm, I'm on line, credit card has cooled down from Christmas...yep, time to get it!
Primary 1: Nada
Primary 2: Zip
Primary 3: Zilch
Aging: Four hops 60 min IPA #3, #4, #5
Fridge/drinking:Chocolate Milk Stout, Four Hops #1, #2, Bunny Banger 90 min IPA #1, #2, Mowin Down a Thirst,
Next up: Headin' for stout season....

 

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