Author Topic: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice  (Read 4322 times)

Offline drb1215

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Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« on: December 19, 2013, 07:18:19 AM »
Hi Folks,

I'm putting together a recipe for a CPA (chipotle pale ale), and I'm looking to see how others have added peppers to their brew.  My plans are to add 8 oz of chipotles with 5 minutes left in the boil, and then steep for 15 minutes at flameout.

Not having added anything to my brew, other than malt, hops, water, and yeast, I don't know if the qty I'm using is too much, too little, or if making the addition that I'm doing will supply some heat and flavor to my beer. At this point it is all experimental...however, I would like to produce a drinkable product.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Dan

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2013, 09:00:32 AM »
I've never made a chilli pepper beer and I'm not a big fan of them. So take what I say with a grain of salt (maybe even a big dose of skepticism) . But, half a pound sounds like a LOT.  most of the Chipotle peppers that I get are pretty spicy.  I would think that half that in 5 gallons would be closer to the mark---maybe even less than that.

My number one rule forany specialty beer is that it needs tto be a good beer first. Any secondary ingredient needs to be subtle.  That's just me. 

My usual approach is to add half of what I think the correct amount is, and then dose the beer with a tincture after fermentation to the desired flavor profile.  I make tinctures with vodka and steep the flavoring for several days, then strain.

On the recipe side, I think I would lean towards a medium to heavy bodied beer. I thinkthat extra bbackbone would help offset to spiciness of the chilis.

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Offline drb1215

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2013, 09:38:04 AM »
Thanks Tom for the advice.

The beer I'm staring with is definitely a good beer, so I have the covered :)  I'll increase the mash temp to provide more body and start with a small amount of peppers (rather than 8 oz).  I can always create a tincture to adjust the flavor / heat after fermentation if need be.

-Dan

Offline Bajaedition

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2013, 11:02:37 AM »
I usually add flavors at the last 15 minutes of boil, so I think you are good there.
I also would like to say that I would take a pretty bland beer to add chiles to, like maybe a blonde ale.
to much other type flavors would seem to mussy up that profile.

also, have you checked around the net doing a search to find out how much peppers others are adding?

just a few thoughts

good luck and post back your results please
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Offline drb1215

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2013, 11:14:10 AM »
Thanks for the feedback Bajaedition.  I have checked around the internet to see what others do...the range of quantity and technique is all over the place! Since I find the info available on this forum to be very useful, I thought I'd post here to get a few more opinions.

-Dan

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2013, 04:58:47 PM »
Are you using loose dry chilis, or the canned ones in adobo?

I'm asking because in my experience the canned ones are very consistent in quality, while the dry ones vary all over the place. 

I would think using the canned ones, a chili per gallon would be more than sufficient. Probably too much. Those things easily take over the flavor of whatever they are in, and they pack quite a burn.  I personally would rather use too little than too much. Since they're canned you can be confident they aren't going to spoil the brew, so I'd add them close to the end of the boil.

In the mean time I'll share a recipe that a vegetarian roommate turned me onto. His name is Del, so I call it the Del Dinner.

Cook a batch of whole grain rice. Refrigerate. Chop or process chipotle in adobo, add it into canned black beans to taste, then add some more.   It's supposed to be spicy enough to make your ears ring. Chop up veggies for your favorite pico de gallo (raw salsa) recipe.  Crush corn chips into the bottom of a pie tin. Spoon cold rice and beans onto the chips.  Bake until the smell fills the room. That's how you know it's hot.  Add some cold pico de gallo. Enjoy!
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Offline Slurk

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Re: Adding Chipotles - looking for advice
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2013, 03:48:42 AM »
In the mean time I'll share a recipe that a vegetarian roommate turned me onto. His name is Del, so I call it the Del Dinner.

Cook a batch of whole grain rice. Refrigerate. Chop or process chipotle in adobo, add it into canned black beans to taste, then add some more.   It's supposed to be spicy enough to make your ears ring. Chop up veggies for your favorite pico de gallo (raw salsa) recipe.  Crush corn chips into the bottom of a pie tin. Spoon cold rice and beans onto the chips.  Bake until the smell fills the room. That's how you know it's hot.  Add some cold pico de gallo. Enjoy!

Thanks for sharing Main Homebrewer!
And, don't forget a couple of cold, crisp-dry beers :P
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