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50% oat grain bill

Neil

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Recently brewed up a batch that had 25% flaked oats 25% malted oats and 50% 2 row. My question is when I go to carb this beer will it need higher volumes of C02 in it because of all the oats?

Carb Method- Spike Carb stone
Vessel- 2 Spike CF5's
 

jtoots

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I don't think so. I've only had one batch that took longer than others to carbonate, it was a milkshake IPA with fruit (in secondary, not in the keg), lactose and vanilla. My guess is that the lactose was the culprit, but not sure about that.
 

Oginme

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No.  Volumes of CO2 are volumes of CO2.  If you set the pressure to get, say, 3.0 volumes for a given storage temperature, then when it reaches equilibrium at the temperature you store the keg at you will have 3.0 volumes.  The oats will probably change the mouthfeel; so for the same volumes of CO2 you carbonate at versus an all-barley beer, you may find a difference in how that carbonation level affects your impression of body.

 

Oginme

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Viscosity (even one so slight as an oat beer vs an all barley beer) will affect the rate of carbonation but not the saturated volume of CO2 into the liquid.  I can fill a keg with water and carbonate to 3.0 volumes of CO2 in the water with the same settings I would use for beer.  If ending gravity, viscosity, or composition of the liquid inside the keg being carbonated made a difference, you would see multiple carbonation charts to account for the various types of fluids which may be in the keg. 
 
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