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Can we brew something good and ready to drink in...

Grummore

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Four to 5 weeks (roughly before August 10th).

Greetings everybody and thank you for your reading if so,

I know brewing a beer is a work of love, we must not rush it and we need to be patient.

For sure, my next batches will be, but not this one, ideally. I'm not a 100% new to brewing, I have read a lot, helped a friend to brew two beers (no expert either, but he knows the minimum to do something good since he brewed 25 recipes in 4 years from kits, extracts, partial mash and a few all-grains).

I'm a bit rushed because I have a medieval one week activity (August 14th to 21st) and I would really love to have something to offer my friends that usually brew beers themselves.

I am seriously open to all type of Ale (not lager), but with the limitation of my material, it have to be an extract recipe. It can have many add-on (small quantity of grains, hops, spices, etc.).

There isn't much place around here where to buy interesting stuff to brew a good beer, but I have to do a 2 hours trips for family vacation next weekend and there are a few good places to buy brewing ingredients there.

After that, I should brew on Monday.

My only concern is that this beer be ready for this activity (or at least as ready as it can).

If I'm too vague, in case you have no clue where to point me, we can go with something light for the summer, something that feels good, even if the temperature is very high.

Much thanks if you can save me. As a good student, I will listen and try to do my best with this recipe.

I am equipped for a 23L (5 gallons) recipe.
 

Mofo

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I'd call ahead to the place(s) you'll be purchasing your ingredients. Since you're brewing extract, they'll likely have kits on hand. Or, if you want something 'outside the box', have them suggest a recipe. It would be a bummer to be given a recipe here only to find that your supplier doesn't have the hops or steeping grains you need. Their suggested recipe should use a yeast that doesn't dally.

Be sure to give them your time constraints. If you're bottling, you'll need 10 days to 2 weeks for your bottles to fully carbonate. If kegging is an option -- and especially if one of your brewer friends knows how to force carbonate -- you're not greatly pressed for time. One last thought on carbonation, though: If you're attending an event themed on the Middle Ages, beers were only naturally carbonated then. Just a thought.

And 23 liters is 6 gallons, not 5. Would hate for you to water down your beer!
 

jomebrew

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My Pale, Brown, Porter and IPA beers are ready in 4-5 weeks.

10 days primary
4-5 days dry hop
3 days cold crash
10 days Keg and carbonation
 

Grummore

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Thanks for all the answers!

And where can we find these recipes?
 

JoePete

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So how did things turn out?

But just to chime in after the fact, if I had to give my three keys to ultra-fast brewing (from least important to most):
[list type=decimal]
[*]Wort chiller or other technique to get to pitch temp asap
[*]Make a starter (even if it adds a day at the start of  your brew, it will shorten your ferment time)
[*]Force carbonate - once transferred into the keg cool it down. Put 30 PSI on and it rock and roll the keg. It takes a little trial and error, isn't perfect, but will give you in about 10 minutes close to what normally takes days or weeks (if you prime).
[/list]
Now assuming you want to bottle for transport, consider a counter pressure filler or something like the Blichman Beer Gun. Your bottles will runneth over as you fill them but if you are OK with a little mess and cleanup, you will get the job done.
 

Grummore

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My apology for not answering! I've been victim of identity theft... Anyway, I am trying to start real life again! Beer. Yes it is. :)

Here is the update and few questions:

I bought a 10 gallons kettle with thermometer and ball valve (with inside tube for whirlwind out the wort after boiling).

I want to brew a 5 gallons recipe.

And I want to do a steeping but I do not find how to add this to the Beersmith software.

Can you help me prepare my recipe in doing the good equipment setup AND add the steeping step to the beersmith software.

Much appreciated.
 
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