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Four Ron Pattinson Recipes

Kevin58

Grandmaster Brewer
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I am a big fan of Ron Pattinson. Ron is a beer historian who tracks down old brewery log books and brewery logs and deciphers the information to post historically accurate recipes from Britain's long lost (many of them) breweries. Here are 4 that I brewed in 2022. My brewing goal that year was to work through all the major styles from Ron Pattinson's blog, Shut Up About Barclay Perkins. I didn't get through them all but these were my favorites. And to brag just a bit... I received a score of 41 with the Truman Porter. My best score ever. And I recorded some of the brew sessions for my YouTube channel. These were two of my favorites from that year...

1890 Truman Porter -

1929 Bohemian Lagerbier -
 

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I am a big fan of Ron Pattinson. Ron is a beer historian who tracks down old brewery log books and brewery logs and deciphers the information to post historically accurate recipes from Britain's long lost (many of them) breweries. Here are 4 that I brewed in 2022. My brewing goal that year was to work through all the major styles from Ron Pattinson's blog, Shut Up About Barclay Perkins. I didn't get through them all but these were my favorites. And to brag just a bit... I received a score of 41 with the Truman Porter. My best score ever. And I recorded some of the brew sessions for my YouTube channel. These were two of my favorites from that year...

1890 Truman Porter -

1929 Bohemian Lagerbier -
I loved the video of 1890 what an excellent video, nice recipe just like the good old days, if you liked the beer and think to brew it again, why not put it some oak chips or cubes just to get that touch of the vat? :)
 
I just bought one of his books with bitter recipes. Trouble is I've never heard of alot of the ingredients!
 
What are some you have questions about?
 
What are some you have questions about?
Lots of hops I've not come across. Are these just suppliers name or are they types of hops? What would you use to replicate them?
Darziel
Lake Kent
Mid Kent
Skyme
Cowell
Knights
Oregon - In England??
Pacifics
Scott
Shew
English
American
Dean
Clement
Minter
Chambers
Maylam
 
Brewers didn't get very specific about the hops they used and often just listed a general geographic area... if they listed anything at all.

Lake Kent and Mid Kent are all hops from the Kent region of England. Most famous of course for East Kent Golding. It wouldn't be too far a stretch to assume hops from those areas are also Golding.

A lot of hops were imported from the United States. Anytime you see Oregon, Pacific or American you can assume something like Cluster.

Shew is an archaic form of the word show.

Dean is a leader... Dean of the guild, Dean of Exeter, etc.

Clement shows up in a couple of ways in Ron's writings. He mentions "clement weather" on occasion and Clement can also be a place name.

The rest I'm not sure about.
 
Yeah that would make sense. All of those words or names were listed as hops. I didn't realize they were importing from America as well as Germany already back then. I read some more of the book, and he gets into the hops in a couple of chapters but still describing types of hops that don't seem to exist anymore..... and I've certainly never heard of! In the recipes it seems that he is using a mixture of hop types, regions and like you say, probably farm names. There would be some educated guesses at replicating any of these recipes. I found a one liner from him that suggests using EKG for earlier beers, mix in some fuggles for any after 1880 and use cluster for anything that sounds American.
 
The British brewers used American hops a lot but mainly for bittering. They didn't like the flavor or aroma but they loved the German hops for those late additions.
 
Here is a fairly recent post where Ron talks about how he translates historic brewing logbooks. In the short paragraph about hops he has this to say:

"Virtually no logs have any record of the hop additions. With the exception of some Barclay Perkins logs. All the other hop additions listed in these recipes are a guesstimate. Feel free to tinker with them as it suits you."

The full article can be found here - http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2023/12/notes-on-my-historic-recipes.html
 
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