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testing yeast after harvesting

Scott Ickes

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Freak's correct.  I don't even pull it out of fermenter.  I'll rack the beer that's in the primary into a carboy and then leave the yeast where it is in that fermentor.  I'll then rack the beer I'm brewing right on top of the yeast cake and put the airlock back on it.

 

Freak

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Scott has a great idea there. Just leave the yeast in your carboy or bucket. Drop the new wort right in on top of it. I can't do that with my equipment but, when I did use carboys I never thought to do that. Good call Scott.
 

Damrite

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I will know for the next time, I did,nt know I could do that, great idea

but for now when you harvest the yeast do you guys pitch in same quantity as the original vial?
 

Damrite

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Hey Freak every time I ask a question here, it cross my mind, I know that people like you had to learn the hard way, and you guys are the  only one to blame for developing this passion of brewing, my wife hates you all  ;)
But I thanks all of you
 

Damrite

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Anybody can help on one question ASAP please.
when you harvest the yeast do you guys pitch in same quantity as the original vial? Or I pitch more for a 5 gal batch... thanks
 

Scott Ickes

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KernelCrush said:
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
  The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
  You're probably overpitching.

 

tom_hampton

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Scott Ickes said:
KernelCrush said:
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
  The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
  You're probably overpitching.

Probably?  Average growth is 4x during primary fermentation.  So, unless you are pitching a barleywine onto a small 9pplato beer... It's definitely overpitching.

 

Scott Ickes

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tom_hampton said:
Scott Ickes said:
KernelCrush said:
Dam! there will be other opinions on this.

You are correct. 

Advantages to pitching onto a yeast cake:
  Less lag time.
  You're definitely not underpitching.
  Strong primary fermentation.

Disadvantages:
  The trub from the previous beer is mixed in with the yeast cake.
  You're probably overpitching.

Probably?  Average growth is 4x during primary fermentation.  So, unless you are pitching a barleywine onto a small 9pplato beer... It's definitely overpitching.

I only consider pitching onto a yeast cake when I'm making something with a 1.090 SG or higher.  Usually it's at 1.100 or higher in reality.  So, it's usually only on a Barley Wine as you suggested or a huge RIS.  Those are the two types of beer that I make that are that high.  Although, I haven't made a Barley Wine in a few years.  I make 4 to 6 batches a year that are of that high of a gravity. 

Looking back through my brew records, I made RIS in the last year that had starting gravities of 1.084, 1.142 and 1.091. 
  >The 1.084 was a smack pack that was stepped up to get the appropriate yeast count. 
  >I then pitched the 1.142 onto that yeast cake. 
  >I made a 1.095 Scottish Ale recently and it was harvested yeast with the proper starter. 
  >The 1.091 was also harvested yeast with the proper starter size. 
  >I also made a 10 gallon batch of Belgian Strong that was at 1.082 this past year, but that was also a smack pack and appropriate
            starter.  I stepped this one up twice, so that I had enough yeast so that I could split the starter between two primary
            fermenters.  I don't have a large enough fermenter to hold an entire 10 gallon batch.

Looking back over the last year, I only pitched onto one yeast cake and I probably didn't overpitch, since it was the huge 1.142 RIS (Tootsie Roll).
 

Damrite

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I took I guess from the yeast calculator website you give me.
sg 1054.. fg 1012.
Density of yeast I would say average.
Yeast was harvest 4 days ago.
I pitch about 2 vial. I'm keeping an eye on it  :(
 

Damrite

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Yes I did kernel crush, It said 3.51 oz. 1 vial is about 2 ounces and I pitch 2 vials. I should be ok, what's your opinion... what happen if you pitch more yeast, would that affect the taste?
Thanks man ;)
 
K

KernelCrush

I gave you the link to that site cause I knew it had pictures to determine slurry density and thats important.  I see that the site has changed the way it calculates and wont be referring it again.  Mr Malty says you needed 125 ml of slurry.  My notes say the white labs vials will hold 50 ml max, so it appears you may have underpitched somewhat.  You may have underestimated your slurry density if you harvested 4 days prior and didnt somehow restir your slurry before pitching.  Did you put it all into suspension in order to pour it into the vials?  When you poured the yeast into your fermentor was it smooth pouring or was it lumpy? 
 

Damrite

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I would say it was in between seems to me that the denslty was close to the white labs vial, I let it sit in the fridge and pour the beer/water from top every day, I pitch another vial from my harvest last night just to be on the safe side
By the way I love that website that you send me. Thanks
 
K

KernelCrush

To correct my post above, a white labs vial is 47 ml full when rechecked by weight.    The yeast book has a great sidebar note about how to estimate slurry concentration using a white labs tube.
 
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