Author Topic: Consistent Phenolic flavour In Lager Beer  (Read 2638 times)

Offline mekushi

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Consistent Phenolic flavour In Lager Beer
« on: November 04, 2017, 06:08:47 AM »
I need help,
noticed my Lager is having consistent phenolic flavor, anybody with useful idea on how to overcome this .

Offline brewfun

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Re: Consistent Phenolic flavour In Lager Beer
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2017, 05:00:09 PM »
What does the phenol taste like? Medicinal? Plastic? Spicy? Something else?

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Offline Ck27

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Re: Consistent Phenolic flavour In Lager Beer
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2017, 05:53:47 PM »
I need help,
noticed my Lager is having consistent phenolic flavor, anybody with useful idea on how to overcome this .

What temps are you fermenting at?? If it's too hot that can happen. As the other guy said chlorine in water or chloramine can cause it, use a campden tablet to remove it.

Offline Baron Von MunchKrausen

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Re: Consistent Phenolic flavour In Lager Beer
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2017, 04:03:58 PM »
Here's my experience brewing lagers.. FWIW.
You really need to dial in your beersmith profiles with a number of ales before throwing a lager at it.
The margin of error is much narrower with lagers than ales - i.e. temp control, water profile, AND Ph
I'm assuming your phenols are medicinal? (seems to be the most common complaint).
My first two lagers were so phenolic they tasted like vicks formula 44 cough syrup.
The common problem of fermenting too hot wasn't it - I have a good controller, thermowell, and fridge chamber.
Water profile wasn't it - I use 100% RO and dialed in the appropriate lager profile in bru'n water for salt additions
My lagers began turning out really well when:
1. I increased the water / grist ratio to slightly reduce the sparge volume
2. Upgraded to a more accurate Ph meter. Light pilsners will need a fair amount of lactic to the mash.
3. Lagers need lots of patience. After fermentation is complete, bump the temp for a good diacetyl rest before lagering.

These are simply a few of my observations. I'm sure there are many more tips to creating a good lager.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 04:07:17 PM by Baron Von MunchKrausen »
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