Author Topic: Hops at flame out  (Read 6213 times)

Offline stephenkrall

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Hops at flame out
« on: March 23, 2013, 06:58:53 AM »
I usually use a hop bag when adding hops to my wert. I do this to cut down on the sediment in my beer. Usually when at flame out I remove the bag and then start chilling my wert. I have several recipes that call for hops to be added at flame out and my questions is should I let the wert sit for a while so the hops have a chance to get fully soaked? Should I throw the flame out hops directly into the wert instead of the hop bag? Adding hops at flame out doesn't seem like a lot of time for the hops to get into the wert.

Thanks
Steve

Offline Maine Homebrewer

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2013, 08:07:13 AM »
I don't bother with a bag anymore. I just toss the pellets right into the brew. Most of them settle out when the chiller does its thing, and are left behind in the brewpot along with a couple cups of wort.
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Offline MaltLicker

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2013, 08:53:21 AM »
.............Adding hops at flame out doesn't seem like a lot of time for the hops to get into the wert. Thanks Steve


It's a timing thing.  Flame-out (or later) hops don't get boiled, so the volatile oils that contribute to flavor and aroma don't get burned off.   So, it's kind of like mash hops or FWH that are steeping at approximately 152F for a while, except flame-out hops steep from 212F down to [whatever] the temp you remove them.   And since they're not boiled, no bitterness is extracted. 

KernelCrush

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2013, 11:32:49 AM »
Try it without a bag whole hops for 20 minutes AFO combined with FWH.   
« Last Edit: March 25, 2013, 04:56:41 AM by KernelCrush »

Offline Kevin58

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2018, 10:05:06 AM »
I use either a bag or ss hop spider and add my flame hop when I turn off the fire (duh) and keep them there while I cool the wort... usually about 15 minutes.
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Offline Beery

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2018, 08:54:06 PM »
I just brewed up the Weldwerks Juicy Bits NEIPA clone and it called for a couple additions of hops for a 40 minutes steep after flameout, then chiller.
In the bottle: Juicy Werks NEIPA clone.
In the fermenter:  Weissbier

Offline jomebrew

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2018, 08:39:03 AM »
I switched to a cylinder  hop screen a.k.a. "hop spider" with 800 micron mesh.    I dump my 60 minute hops before adding my whirlpool hops. 
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 04:41:49 PM by jomebrew »

Offline bobo1898

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Re: Hops at flame out
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2018, 01:45:04 PM »
Everyone, for the most part, has said it.

You can either throw them directly in and let them stand for x amount of time or throw them in your bag and do the same thing. Or like jomebrew does, remove your boiled hops and add your whirlpool hops.

Personally, I throw them directly in and give it a good stir. I like to keep everything in. Maine Homebrewer is right, the hops will settle out as you chill. Although your bag probably makes clean up faster.

Depending on what I want out of the beer, I'll either immediately chill or I'll them stand anywhere between 20-45 minutes. Temperature after FO also will have a different effect--you'll still get some bitterness (not a lot) around 185 and above. Below that is more flavor and aroma.
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