Author Topic: First Time BIAB  (Read 2937 times)

Offline pnutbutterfluff

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First Time BIAB
« on: July 12, 2020, 11:43:16 AM »
Did my first BIAB and missed my target OG by 3 and then didn't let it settle enough after boil so started sucking up hops into fermenter during transfer.  Now it has been 24hrs since I pitched the yeast (Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley 1.5 packets) into my 4.25Gal of Wort in the Fermzilla and no activity.  The temp of the wort on pitching was 66degF and is now 65degF and stable.  Should I be worried?  I didn't do a starter and did put yeast nutrient in wort during boil.

Thanks for any advice.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2020, 04:17:36 PM by pnutbutterfluff »

Offline Oginme

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Re: First Time BIAB
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2020, 12:55:57 PM »
How are you determining activity?  Did you oxygenate your wort when you poured it in or after it sat for a bit?

I would make sure your fermenter is sealed up.  Most of the time, slow activity is due to the yeast doing aerobic activity and multiplying.  Depending upon the date of the yeast packet and the storage conditions, your number of active cells may be on the low side and it will take them some time budding up new cells to start vigorous fermentation activity.  I would give it another 24 hours to see if it develops a krausen and takes off.  If you are unsure, give it another day and then take a sample for a gravity reading. 

Let us know how it comes out!

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Offline pnutbutterfluff

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Re: First Time BIAB
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2020, 01:39:41 PM »
How are you determining activity?  Did you oxygenate your wort when you poured it in or after it sat for a bit?

I am only determining it subjectively by looking at airlock and any visible activity.  I shook the wort in fermenter to aerate it before putting it to rest.  I was just worried because I read some places that after 24hrs of no activity the wort can start to spoil.  I'll give it another 24hrs and report back!  Thanks again Oginme!

Offline Kevin58

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Re: First Time BIAB
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2020, 08:35:03 AM »
CO2 gasses will escape through the path of least resistance. If your airlock does not fit tightly around the mouth of your fermenter the gasses will escape around those edges. It is really not a problem. The bottom line is that bubbles in the airlock is not a true indicator of fermentation activity.

It takes very big mistakes by the brewer to stop beer from becoming beer. If you made a decent wort and you add reasonably healthy yeast then you will get beer. All it takes is patience.

There is a gentleman who is often called the Godfather of homebrewing. He was holding classes in his kitchen long before homebrewing in the U.S. was even legal and wrote a book that was (and for some still is) considered the Bible of homebrewing. His name is Charlie Papazian and the book is The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I only mention all of that because there are many new brewers in the hobby who are not familiar with Charlie these days. Charlie made famous a philosophy which says; "Relax, Don't Worry. Have a Homebrew". If you missed your OG by 3 points... relax, don't worry. If the trub from the boil kettle gets sucked into your fermenter... relax, don't worry. Have a homebrew and if those little things matter to you just try and do a little better next time.
If you?re stressing over homebrewing, you?re doing something wrong.
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Offline pnutbutterfluff

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Re: First Time BIAB
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2020, 04:12:31 PM »
CO2 gasses will escape through the path of least resistance. If your airlock does not fit tightly around the mouth of your fermenter the gasses will escape around those edges. It is really not a problem. The bottom line is that bubbles in the airlock is not a true indicator of fermentation activity.

It takes very big mistakes by the brewer to stop beer from becoming beer. If you made a decent wort and you add reasonably healthy yeast then you will get beer. All it takes is patience.

There is a gentleman who is often called the Godfather of homebrewing. He was holding classes in his kitchen long before homebrewing in the U.S. was even legal and wrote a book that was (and for some still is) considered the Bible of homebrewing. His name is Charlie Papazian and the book is The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. I only mention all of that because there are many new brewers in the hobby who are not familiar with Charlie these days. Charlie made famous a philosophy which says; "Relax, Don't Worry. Have a Homebrew". If you missed your OG by 3 points... relax, don't worry. If the trub from the boil kettle gets sucked into your fermenter... relax, don't worry. Have a homebrew and if those little things matter to you just try and do a little better next time.

Excellent advice! And I will try and follow it more as I continue.  I will also find that book and give it a read. 

The good news update is that 36hrs into the fermentation time it came alive and is churning away now!