Author Topic: Bottle conditioning yeast  (Read 10175 times)

Offline Berkyjay

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Bottle conditioning yeast
« on: September 21, 2009, 12:47:19 AM »
I'm curious if anyone here repitches yeast before bottling.  If so do you have a suggestion for a good neutral yeast with which to use for bottle conditioning Belgian Ales?

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2009, 07:28:03 AM »
The "Type" of Belgian would be a determining factor in the yeast selection. If possible use the same yeast that you pitched in the primary. Stay away from pitching any champagne/wine yeast IMO. Fortunately there is a wide selection of Belgian yeasts, and if you wanted to change, use something in the same family. Watch for the Alcohol tolerance and you should be fine. You would not want to pitch something that is not alcohol tolerant into a double or triple.

Cheers
Preston
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Offline Berkyjay

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2009, 11:49:07 AM »
The "Type" of Belgian would be a determining factor in the yeast selection. If possible use the same yeast that you pitched in the primary. Stay away from pitching any champagne/wine yeast IMO. Fortunately there is a wide selection of Belgian yeasts, and if you wanted to change, use something in the same family. Watch for the Alcohol tolerance and you should be fine. You would not want to pitch something that is not alcohol tolerant into a double or triple.

Cheers
Preston

Yeah, the same yeast is what I thought would be the most logical choice.  But in my studies I have read that some or all of the Trappists  use a neutral yeast and adds very little to the taste.  I have been trying to find out if anything like this is available.

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2009, 01:11:32 PM »
I don't think that "all Belgians/Trappists" use a different yeast, but I have also read that some do. I have also read that some take yeast at high Krausen and use it for bottling. Alcohol tolerance would be the determining factor for using a different yeast. Something similar to an S-05 would work as long as the alcohol was not to high. However I would stick with the original yeast just to be sure there are not any issues with alcohol tolerance.

I have lots of books about the subject mater, I will look tonight when I get home and let you know what I find tomorrow.

Cheers
Preston
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Offline Berkyjay

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2009, 02:05:47 PM »
I don't think that "all Belgians/Trappists" use a different yeast, but I have also read that some do. I have also read that some take yeast at high Krausen and use it for bottling. Alcohol tolerance would be the determining factor for using a different yeast. Something similar to an S-05 would work as long as the alcohol was not to high. However I would stick with the original yeast just to be sure there are not any issues with alcohol tolerance.

I have lots of books about the subject mater, I will look tonight when I get home and let you know what I find tomorrow.

Cheers
Preston

You are probably correct in suggesting on using the same yeast to bottle condition since I don't have any way to filter out the yeast that is already in there.  If I had a way to filter my beer I might be inclined to try a separate bottling yeast if I could find one. Oh well, thanks for the suggestions.

Offline SOGOAK

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2009, 05:35:48 AM »
My latest belgian was a blond on wy3684 (or 3648 whatever unibroue is)

I was lazy and left the brew in primary for 2-3 months. Result was super clear beer.  I purposely let my siphon grab some yeast for carb and they too dropped out in the bottles.

I split the cake and did 10gal about 3 weeks ago. I'll post if it comes out great again.
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Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2009, 07:36:50 AM »
If you don't already have the Book "Wild Brews" by Jeff Sparrow, Get it! I also checked Farmhouse ales and Brew like a monk but neither had any suggestions.

So Jeff recommends two yeasts that are neutral enough for bottle conditioning (pg. 253). The first is Wyeast German Ale (1007). The second one is White Labs California Ale yeast (WLP001). He states that acidity and a low PH can harm Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jeff explains that both strains are tolerant of acidity, neutral in flavor, and do well in harsh conditions.

There you go! The more I learn, the more I realize how much I still have to learn! Belgians and Scotches are two of my favorite styles. I think I like the Belgians because that's about the time (Mid 1800's) that they were figuring out what yeast was and how it affected beer flavors, along with Pasteurization. So they were trying all different kinds of things in an effort to make their beer taste good and last through the summer.

Anyhow, hope this helps!

Cheers
Preston
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Offline Berkyjay

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2009, 01:33:37 PM »
If you don't already have the Book "Wild Brews" by Jeff Sparrow, Get it! I also checked Farmhouse ales and Brew like a monk but neither had any suggestions.

So Jeff recommends two yeasts that are neutral enough for bottle conditioning (pg. 253). The first is Wyeast German Ale (1007). The second one is White Labs California Ale yeast (WLP001). He states that acidity and a low PH can harm Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jeff explains that both strains are tolerant of acidity, neutral in flavor, and do well in harsh conditions.

There you go! The more I learn, the more I realize how much I still have to learn! Belgians and Scotches are two of my favorite styles. I think I like the Belgians because that's about the time (Mid 1800's) that they were figuring out what yeast was and how it affected beer flavors, along with Pasteurization. So they were trying all different kinds of things in an effort to make their beer taste good and last through the summer.

Anyhow, hope this helps!

Cheers
Preston

Ah excellent!  I do have the Farmhouse Ales book but not the Wild Brews...yet.  I haven't yet dug into the Farmhouse Ales but will soon.  That is good information on those two yeasts.  Yeah, Belgians are my favorite style as well.  I'm a huge history buff and the history of the Trappist Ales grabs me....as well as the wonderful flavors.  My goal is to get as close to a Rochefort style as I can.  It is really fun breaking down what I am doing wrong and what i am doing right after every brew.  Unfortunately it is such a slow process and I am starting to hit the wall with the equipment available to me.

Offline UselessBrewing

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2009, 07:23:22 AM »
I am starting to hit the wall with the equipment available to me.
You and me both!  ;D

Cheers
Preston
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Offline MaltLicker

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2009, 05:46:40 PM »
I am starting to hit the wall with the equipment available to me.
You and me both!  ;D  Cheers   Preston 

Me too.  An apt description of brew day yesterday, bouncing around hitting walls at every turn.  And then my first total yeast failure when I checked this morning.   :'(

Offline bonjour

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Re: Bottle conditioning yeast
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2009, 07:20:56 AM »
My beers are either too big to bottle condition, in that case I force carb them, or I have absolutely no problem with residual yeast ( I usually make sure I pick-up a small amount of yeast into me bottling bucket.

 

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