Author Topic: Steep Grains Volume  (Read 8053 times)

Offline rmikulec

  • BeerSmith New Brewer
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Steep Grains Volume
« on: December 14, 2012, 06:43:40 AM »
I apologize, but I am a new user starting out with extract brewing.  In the brew steps, it clearly defines the grains to be used in the the steep.  But, I cannot find where it tells the amount of water to be used when steeping.  I see the boil volumes, but not the volume to be used when steeping.

Also, is "steeping" = "partial mash"

Thanks for the help.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2012, 08:01:10 AM by rmikulec »

Offline jomebrew

  • Global Moderator
  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
    • Jomebrew
Re: Steep Grains Volume
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2012, 09:35:07 AM »
I neither steep grains or do partial mashes.  I have never done an extract batch.

Steeping grains are used with extract brews.  Everyone extract batch I watched steeped the grains they were going to use to boil the extract. 

Partial mash is an actual mash done with a small amount of grains with the rest of the batch as extract.  Some specialty grains are not available as extract so you need to mash those to get their character.


Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: Steep Grains Volume
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2012, 04:49:14 PM »
Think of the steeped grains as tea. They add flavor and color, but nothing that will turn into alcohol. Just add them (bagged of course, loose enough for circulation) to the water you will be using for the batch, and pull them out before the water comes to a boil. If they're in there while it's too hot (180 and up I think?) they'll leach out tannins which you do not want.

Partial mash involves going through the entire mash process and then adding extract to the boil. It's kind of like brewing a pot of coffee from freshly roasted beans and then finishing it off with a heap of Folgers crystals.  What you'll have will be loads better than instant coffee, but most coffee lovers would take a sip and then leave it be.

Read up on all grain brewing. It takes more time and requires an investment in equipment, but the final product costs less and is a hundred times better.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline alcaponejunior

  • Having a homebrewed IPA
  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 69
  • Up next: ESB
    • Beer And Stuff
Re: Steep Grains Volume
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 01:32:57 PM »
When I was doing steeping grains, I would use about 1.25 quarts per pound of grain.  Worked fine for me.

Later I moved up to partial mashes, adding some extracts to the products of the partial mash, using both base malt and specialty grains.  I stuck with 1.25 q/lb and it continued to work fine. 

Temperature is probably more important than volume for steeping grains, but both are important with partial mash.  Just make sure the temperature doesn't get too high though.  Tannins and all.

Offline Skippy

  • BeerSmith Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 30
  • I like Beer!
Re: Steep Grains Volume
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2012, 04:03:12 PM »
I apologize, but I am a new user starting out with extract brewing.  In the brew steps, it clearly defines the grains to be used in the the steep.  But, I cannot find where it tells the amount of water to be used when steeping.  I see the boil volumes, but not the volume to be used when steeping.

Also, is "steeping" = "partial mash"

Thanks for the help.

Steeping isn't the same as partial mash. The volume of steeping water isn't very important like it is for partial mash or full mash.


For a "5 gallon" extract batch, I use 7 gallons of water total and end up bottling about 4.75-5.25 gallons of beer:

I steep in a separate pot from the brew kettle and use 2 gallons of water for steeping 1-2lbs of grain. 

Heat the water to 150-160F.  Kill the flame.  Then insert the grain bag and steep for 30-45mins.  This method provides good and consistent results.

While the grains are steeping, I heat 5 gallons of water in the brew kettle and then dump the steep in the brew kettle when it's ready.


If it was a partial mash instead of a steep, then I'd use less water.  1.5-2 quarts per pound of grain.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2012, 04:17:25 PM by Skippy »

 

modification