Author Topic: saint from PA  (Read 3801 times)

Offline saint

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saint from PA
« on: January 13, 2013, 06:32:04 AM »
I'm new to brewing and still trying to convince the wife that this is a good idea/ hobby! I purchased a Brewers Best German Oktoberfest kit and would appreciate any tips to help this turn out right. When I bought it I asked the brew store owner what the difference between a beginner kit and an intermediate skill level kit was - he told me that there wasn't any difference, just a few more steps are involved with brewing it. It turns out that those "few steps" include lagering, which I am not in anyway prepared for. Does anyone know what will happen if I skip the lagering process? Will the beer turn out ok? I already purchased a 25' stainless steel wort chiller is there anything else that is essential before starting that will make my life easier? Thanks for reading this and any help will be greatly appreciated! I would also like to meet any brewers within SW PA.

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: saint from PA
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2013, 06:48:00 AM »
I'd suggest going back and getting an ale kit of some kind instead of the lager kit. Lagers need to be keptat about 48 tto 50 degrees for a couple of weeks.  Unless you have an empty refrigerator and a temperatureccontroller thatis hard to do .

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Offline jomebrew

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Re: saint from PA
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2013, 10:53:41 AM »
I'd suggest going back and getting an ale kit of some kind instead of the lager kit. Lagers need to be keptat about 48 tto 50 degrees for a couple of weeks.  Unless you have an empty refrigerator and a temperatureccontroller thatis hard to do .

I'll add that both ale and lagers need to be kept at a consistent temperature.  Swinging temps of a few degrees create noticeable artifacts in the final beer.

Offline saint

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Re: saint from PA
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2013, 03:47:51 AM »
Thanks Tom and Jomebrew for the replies - I tried to take it back but I couldn't because it was opened.  I'm going to try to build a chill box out of insulating foamboard, bottles of ice and using a computer fan to help circulate the air to keep it cool. Hopefully it will work well enough until i can build a lagering fridge with a temperature controller. Has anyone tried this method? Was it successful?

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: saint from PA
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2013, 04:57:24 PM »
Lots of folks do that.  Look up "son of fermentation chiller" over at homebrewtalk.com. 

Another idea: use an ale yeast instead of the lager yeast, such as WLP001, or Safale US-05. 
R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline mcliff1971

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Re: saint from PA
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 06:25:08 AM »
Lots of folks do that.  Look up "son of fermentation chiller" over at homebrewtalk.com. 

Another idea: use an ale yeast instead of the lager yeast, such as WLP001, or Safale US-05.

Found the direct link at http://home.roadrunner.com/~brewbeer/chiller/chiller.PDF
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