Author Topic: Hello from Florida  (Read 4009 times)

Offline unclevername

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Hello from Florida
« on: January 14, 2013, 12:26:31 PM »
Hello everyone, My name is Brad Freeman and I live in the greater Tampa Bay area.  I used to brew when I was in college back in the 80's, but not have not done so in many many years. At that time I was only brewing extract beers and had never even heard of anyone brewing all grains other than the big breweries.  Recently the wifey and I became empty nesters and decided to put the empty bedrooms to good use and make a brewery out them  :) ;D.  So we have new hobby, making beer.

In the past few weeks I have assembled my brewery and plan to the first run this coming weekend.  It will be an all grain IPA and I am leaning toward the NATCA Jack IPA recipe I saw on the beersmith recipe web site.

My mash tun is a converted 10 gallon water cooler.  My brew kettle is a 10 gallon bayou classic.  I have a 6.5 gallon bucket for my primary and a glass 5 gal carboy for my secondary.  I read Brad Smiths book last weekend and am loaded with just enough knowledge to get into a little trouble.

I am buying the beersmith software as well.

Offline mcliff1971

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2013, 04:43:09 PM »
Brad -
Good luck on the first batch since your return to home brewing!  Beersmith is a great tool!  Wishing you nothing but the best with the upcoming brew!
On Tap - Hard Cider
Fermenting - Brown Ale, Irish Stout, Irish Red
On Deck - Kentucky Common

Offline unclevername

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2013, 01:48:21 PM »
Made my first run yesterday and all in all it went pretty well I think.  It took about five hours, mostly because of my inefficiency.  But I hit the specific gravities pretty closely and the wort is a beautiful amber.  I tasted the wort and it was a very nice balance, of malt and hops, albeit very thick with sugar.  Last night the fermentation came to life and this morning it was chugging pretty good.  It was a great day, 72 degrees and sunny.  A great day to hang out and make beer.

Offline jomebrew

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2013, 08:58:39 AM »
Sounds like a good brew day.  5 hours is typical.   I tend to spend too much time watching the fermentation activity in the carboy.  It is kind of mesmerizing. 

Offline unclevername

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2013, 05:07:10 AM »
I know there is another forum for questions like this, but since I already have information on my brew here I am going to ask the question here.

My fermentation was very strong for Monday and Tuesday. It started to slow on Wednesday and today, on Thursday it has slowed considerably. I had planned on racking the wort to the secondary on Sunday but now I am wondering if I shouldn't do it earlier.  My question is there a benefit for moving to the secondary quickly, or inversely, leaving it in the primary for longer?

Offline Humble Brewer

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2013, 09:48:50 AM »
Leave it in the primary.  Moving the beer risks infection, aeration, and doesn't noticeably improve the beer.  These days unless I am dry hopping I let it ride.
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Offline jomebrew

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2013, 09:50:02 AM »
This is a typical fermentation.  Don't rush it.   There is a lot of benefit leaving it on the yeast and almost no benefit ever racking to a secondary.  After a week, it is good to let the temp rise naturally a couple degrees which helps the yeast metabolize off flavors they create.


Offline unclevername

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Re: Hello from Florida
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2013, 03:10:26 PM »
Thanks guys I will let it ride.