Author Topic: pilsner vs 6-row  (Read 21748 times)

Offline Slurk

  • Slurk
  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 370
  • Life is too short!
    • SLURK BEER  By Foeyn Minibryggeri
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2013, 04:45:44 AM »
I know it's borderline blasphemy for a homebrewer to make American adjunct pilsner, but I'm doing it anyway. They say it's the most difficult brew a homebrewer can attempt because with so little flavor there is no wiggle room, and I'm stepping up to the challenge.
See what happens.

You will see that you again brewed a very good and tastefull beer with a nice profile ;) However, you will realize (again) you didn't even got close to the wiggle room you are referring to.  At least Maine H. you had the guts to try 8)  Cheers!!
Regards,
Slurk
Ad Fundum!

Ready to drink: Slurk Fjellbrygg, Slurk Foeyn Ale, Slurk Agurk (Cucumber Wit), Slurk Belgian Blonde, Slurk Eng (Raspberry Wit), Slurk Hav (Seaweed Wit)
Aging: Slurk Whirled White Wheat (Wit)
Fermenting:
Next brew: Slurk Hav

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2013, 08:18:35 AM »
Quote
you will realize (again) you didn't even got close to the wiggle room you are referring to

Yeah. I figure I'll need to use closer to 40% adjuncts to reach that wiggle room. 25% ain't close. Baby steps.  Maybe one day I'll put AB InBev out of business!
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2013, 12:45:13 PM »
Well that packet of S-23 hadn't done much by this morning, so I pitched in the yeast from a previous batch that I had been using to practice yeast washing. Must have done something right because it took right off.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline tstinz01

  • BeerSmith New Brewer
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2013, 09:43:53 AM »
I used 6 row in an IPA along with 2 row and CC10.  Called it 2x6 IPA.  Turned out pretty tasty.  Revised recipe to add some additional grains for color and malt flavor, but haven't brewed it yet...will soon see how tweaks turn out.

Offline durrettd

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 392
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2013, 11:22:16 AM »
I did a Classic American Pilsner (CAP) about four weeks ago and kegged/crashed it (as a clarifying secondary) at three weeks. It's three pounds of flaked corn and ten pounds of 6-row, mashed at 155 F, fermented at 50 F. So far it's very pale, cloudy, has a very faint sweetness, dry finish, and very faint maltiness. Unfortunately, it tastes a lot like a contemporary mass-market Pilsner, but it's been educational. Even if I don't drink much of it, I can palm it off on the unsuspecting, and it was fun to brew.

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2013, 06:36:48 PM »
Reason number umptysquat to use a roller mill instead of a pain-in-the-butt-to-adjust corona mill: Those six row kernels are indeed smaller. 

Ground stuff up for adjunct number two.  3# 6-row and 5# pils. Thing is adjusted great for the larger 2-row pils. But not the 6-row.   Hope it's crushed enough to do its magic on the 3# maize that will accompany it in the mash tomorrow.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2013, 06:38:47 PM »
Quote
Unfortunately, it tastes a lot like a contemporary mass-market Pilsner

Isn't that the point? That means you nailed the style! Good job!
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2013, 03:31:38 PM »
76% efficiency (5.5g @ 1.050) so I guess the grind wasn't too bad.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline tom_hampton

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 929
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
    • Tom's Miata Racing Blog
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2013, 03:41:31 PM »
76% efficiency (5.5g @ 1.050) so I guess the grind wasn't too bad.

Mash efficiency or total?

I always shoot for mid to low 70s for total eff.
R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2013, 05:25:28 PM »
Quote
Mash efficiency or total?

I always shoot for mid to low 70s for total eff.

I guess I don't understand the question.
3# corn + 3# 6-row + 5# pils -> 5.5g @ 1.050 = 76%

What's the difference between mash and total?
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline tom_hampton

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 929
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
    • Tom's Miata Racing Blog
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2013, 06:19:54 PM »
Mash efficiency is sugars extracted from the mash. Total efficiency is sugars into the fermentr... What you calculated.
I concern myself more with mash efficiency because it has more impact on beer quality.  I prefer to keep my mash efficiency down to 75% or so. Higher than that generally means that the sparge has gotten low enough to risk tannin extraction from the husks. So, I use more grain, stop the sparge sooner and add water to make my preboilvolume.   
R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline Maine Homebrewer

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1371
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2013, 08:00:29 PM »
I like tannins in wine, and haven't ever noted them in my homebrew.
"To alcohol! The cause of - and solution to - all of life's problems!" -Homer Simpson

Offline beernbourbon

  • "A word to the wise isn't necessary, it's the stupid ones that need it"
  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 114
  • Beer and Bourbon: No other liquids necessary
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2013, 08:01:32 PM »
Mash efficiency is sugars extracted from the mash. Total efficiency is sugars into the fermentr... What you calculated.
I concern myself more with mash efficiency because it has more impact on beer quality.  I prefer to keep my mash efficiency down to 75% or so. Higher than that generally means that the sparge has gotten low enough to risk tannin extraction from the husks. So, I use more grain, stop the sparge sooner and add water to make my preboilvolume.   
So that's what Palmer's talking about with the commercial breweries vs us homebrewers, we can afford the extra grain, since we do it on such a small scale, so we can allow the efficiencies to be a little low.......<another AHA! moment brought to you by the experience and wisdom of Tom!> ;D
Primary 1: Nada
Primary 2: Zip
Primary 3: Zilch
Aging: Four hops 60 min IPA #3, #4, #5
Fridge/drinking:Chocolate Milk Stout, Four Hops #1, #2, Bunny Banger 90 min IPA #1, #2, Mowin Down a Thirst,
Next up: Headin' for stout season....

Offline tom_hampton

  • BeerSmith Grandmaster Brewer
  • *****
  • Posts: 929
  • BeerSmith 2 Rocks!
    • Tom's Miata Racing Blog
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2013, 08:41:52 PM »
I like tannins in wine, and haven't ever noted them in my homebrew.

So do I. Tannins are a very large class of organic chemicals.  They have a very broad range of flavors. The tannin in barley husks ddon't aren't as nice as those in red wine. Husky, grainy, flavors as well as the stereotypical tea leave mouth puckering texture all come from sparging to too low of a gravity.  Too low is generally below 1.010, or a ph above 6.0. But, it's not really digital. They closer the runnings get to these limits the lower the quality of the resulting wort.

That's why not sparge makes such a nice beer. And, it's why the second or third beer in a party gyle brew aren't as nice as the first.
R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes

Offline alcaponejunior

  • Having a homebrewed IPA
  • BeerSmith Master Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 69
  • Up next: ESB
    • Beer And Stuff
Re: pilsner vs 6-row
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2013, 05:50:58 PM »
I also ordered a ten pounder of flaked maize. I've got plenty of noble hops on hand.  Figure I'll try my hand at an adjunct beer. Something light to enjoy after some yard work.

Thinking 1.035 - 1.040 starting gravity, 60% 6-row and 40% corn, Tettnanger hops, lager yeast. Will post the details as I work it out.

American piss, here I come!

I've been using a pound of flaked corn in my bleach blonde ale and it is getting brewed for the fourth time, third time with this grain bill, if that says anything!  I originally added the corn to lighten it up a bit and make it more appealing to BMC drinkers like my bro and our friend who always helps us brew.  Thing is, they're quickly becoming homebrew and craft beer lovers.  Big "D" bought a sixer of stone IPA today!  And liked it!  Bro is still mostly Busch for commercial but has drank plenty of every homebrew we've made.  So the reason for putting corn in has vanished.  However, the recipe remains good and is one of two "house brews."

I've used six-row once in a partial mash recipe, a couple pounds worth or so.  Couldn't really tell the dif with other similar recipes that used two-row.  From reading this thread I might try it when I want to make a maltier beer.

 

modification