Author Topic: help in recipe formulation  (Read 3514 times)

Offline Rahul

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help in recipe formulation
« on: December 21, 2013, 03:43:58 PM »
Hii guy's  want help in recipe formulation so pls helo me out.

Offline Scott Ickes

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Re: help in recipe formulation
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2013, 04:34:36 PM »
ummmmmmmmmmmm....beer is made from grain, hops, yeast and water....
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Aging:
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Scott Ickes
https://creativebrewing.wordpress.com

Offline Rahul

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Re: help in recipe formulation
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2013, 10:45:49 AM »
Yup thanks. That I know .I'm working in brewery for paat a year iwant to learn to design a beer recipe.
 

Offline brewfun

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Re: help in recipe formulation
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2013, 11:40:05 AM »
Observe what the recipes are in your brewery and taste the finished beer. This will help you understand how the various ingredients and process create the flavors.

Also, read recipes on various forums. You will quickly see that there are lots of ways to approach the same "style" of beer. If you have the opportunity, make some small batches (20l or less) to try out different malt/hop/yeast combinations.

Fundamentally, you are making a soup. Think of grain as the "flavor" of the soup. Think of hops as the "spice" of that soup. They can work together to bring out the best in each other and when the occasion calls, the soup can be very "Spicy."

A solid place to start learning the relationship between ingredients and flavors is with the book "Brewing Classic Styles," by Jamil Zainascheff.  There are many, many others, too, but this one is a direct line between a recipe and beer style.
Beer Appreciation is the space between pints.

Offline drb1215

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Re: help in recipe formulation
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2013, 02:08:43 PM »
Ray Daniels "Designing Great Beers" is also a good book to checkout for looking at how to build recipes. Also, you can find a podcast on the beer smith.com site where Brad interviews Ray Daniels.

-Dan

Offline tom_hampton

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Re: help in recipe formulation
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2014, 02:10:26 PM »
I agree with Brewfun and Dan.  BCS is as solid a list of recipes as there is.  DGB is interesting, and helpful IF YOU ALREADY HAVE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE INGREDIENTS and what they taste like. 

If you don't have the flavor memory in your head already, then you need to develop that.  I did it by making tons of SMaSH beers, and other single change types of experiments (basically SMaSH beers with one additional grain per batch).  Eg:

SMaSH + C40
SMaSH + C60
SMaSH + C80
SMaSH + C120
etc.

SMaSH + Munich
SMaSH + Pale Chocolate
SMaSH + Dark Chocolate
etc.

They may not be "great" beers, but you can do side-by-side tastings, and learn what each grain adds in flavor. 

Once you have that flavor memory, you can then understand what DGB is telling you, when it says that most recipes for style X have YY% of malt Z. 
R.I.P.:Belgian Blonde
On Tap: Apfelwein, Kolsch(v2), Pumpkin Ale, Belgian Specialty 
Aging/Storing: Coffee Porter, Chocolate Porter, Flanders Red, English Barlywine
Fermenting: Maggie's Altbier
Next Up: PtE(1.1), Belgian Dubbel?

Working thru all BCS recipes