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Additional Pectin Enzyme?

bobo1898

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Got 6 gallons of apple juice fermenting in primary. I was planning on adding some fresh fruit puree in secondary.

I've already added pectin enzyme to the apple juice before I pitched the yeast. With this upcoming fruit addition, I'm wondering if I need to add more pectin enzyme when adding this fruit addition?
 

brewfun

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This is an interesting question with no clear answer. You might get a more complete answer on a wine forum.

It's going to depend on the amount you've already used, fermentation temperature and pH. Adding too much pectinase can lead to ciders that taste "past their prime." Higher fermentation temperatures and higher pH with pectinase can lead to methanol production that tests the threshold of safe to drink. Not typically harmful levels, but definitely harsher hangovers.

The next consideration is the type of fruit in you're adding. Raspberry or stone fruits need more pectic enzyme than apples. Still, the accumulated dose needed shouldn't exceed 1/2 teaspoon per gallon.

If your temperature and pH have been very stable, and if there isn't a lot of skin and pulp already in there, the pectinase is probably still active up to 7 days. However, if it was added along with metabisulfate, then the life is much shorter and you may need more pectinase.



 

bobo1898

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Thanks for the reply, as always, brewfun.

brewfun said:
It's going to depend on the amount you've already used, fermentation temperature and pH. Adding too much pectinase can lead to ciders that taste "past their prime." Higher fermentation temperatures and higher pH with pectinase can lead to methanol production that tests the threshold of safe to drink.

I had six gallons of juice so I used 3 tsp of pectin enzyme. I'm fermenting this around 64/66 degrees. I have not taken a pH reading. Is there a rule of thumb for cider and pH that I need to be concerned about?

The cider will stay at this temp for the duration of primary--which will most likely be a month or so. Secondary will also be at this temperature.

brewfun said:
The next consideration is the type of fruit in you're adding. Raspberry or stone fruits need more pectic enzyme than apples. Still, the accumulated dose needed shouldn't exceed 1/2 teaspoon per gallon.

It's a toss up between raspberry and pear. I'm leaning towards the latter. Perhaps to be safe, I shouldn't worry about the pectin enzyme. It's just a concern for haze, right? Or am I missing something? There wasn't much pulp content in the initial juice. I didn't have to add a campden tablet as the juice was pasteurized.
 

brewfun

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Cider pH tends to be around 3.5 pH, and no lower than 3. Your fermentation range is in the "moderate" category, if not close to cold for most cider yeasts. So, things seem positive for longer pectinase life.

Your dosing is at the limit of what I recommended in my first response. So, I'd just add the fruit and let it go. After a few days, you could chill a sample to < 38oF, and see if it's unacceptably hazy. If it is, try just one teaspoon for the whole batch, up to the full rate for the additional juice.

How many gallons of new fruit are you adding?
 

bobo1898

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For the fruit addition, I haven't measured out the gallons. I know that I want to add about 2-3 lbs of pureed fruit. It might work out to 1 gallon or so. Might not sound like a lot but that's because I'm splitting up my 6 gallons into two 3 gallon batches in secondary. The 2-3 lbs of pureed fruit will go into 3 gallons of cider.

Yeah I don't think I'll worry too much about haze anymore with the amount that I've already added. I mean it may be hazy with the fruit addition, but for this batch I won't worry too much. I'll adjust for the next time.

I'll check the pH when fermentation is finished. It's going to be in primary for a while with the temp I'm fermenting at so I'll just be patient. I'm actually using an ale yeast and not a cider yeast (not sure if that matters).
 
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