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How to taste beer

bfred805

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I'd like to refine my palette. I love beer and can note that some are better than others. I've never really understood what it is about the good ones it is that I like and what it is about the bad ones that I don't like. For example I hear people say a hop in beer has grapefruit notes, what does that mean? If I eat a grapefruit while drinking the beer, should it make sense then? How do people develop this database if flavor and aromas for which to base their reviews on?

Are there any suggestions from the community to improve my knowledge of taste and aromas in the beer I am drinking?
 

brewfun

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Great palates are trained, not born.

The BJCP study guide has some excellent information on the basics of beer evaluation, off flavors and flavor development. Similarly, the Cicerone syllabus is great training material. The difference between the two is that the BJCP is focused on the brewer and the Cicerone program is focused on the consumer.

Every time you open a beer and pour it into a glass, Give it a small evaluation. Equate the aroma and flavors of beer to your other food experience. As you develop a vocabulary for your perceptions, you are training your palate.

Tasting and talking about beer with respected brewers and aficionados is a great fast track to developing your palate.
 

riceral

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brewfun said:
Great palates are trained, not born.

The BJCP study guide has some excellent information on the basics of beer evaluation, off flavors and flavor development. Similarly, the Cicerone syllabus is great training material. The difference between the two is that the BJCP is focused on the brewer and the Cicerone program is focused on the consumer.

Every time you open a beer and pour it into a glass, Give it a small evaluation. Equate the aroma and flavors of beer to your other food experience. As you develop a vocabulary for your perceptions, you are training your palate.

Brewfun has given some great advise.

An additional resource would be Randy Mosher's book Tasting Beer: An Insider's Guide to the World's Greatest Drink. http://www.amazon.com/Tasting-Beer-Insiders-Worlds-Greatest/dp/1603420894/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1398518913&sr=1-1&keywords=tasting+beer

Though you don't need to read Mosher's book, I think it helps support Brewfun's suggestions…….but not replace them.

brewfun said:
Tasting and talking about beer with respected brewers and aficionados is a great fast track to developing your palate.

Joining a homebrew club would also be help as you would be around people who are passionate about good beer.


 

bfred805

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Seems so obvious, but your advise was 100% on.

After reading your post, I went out and bought Randy Mosher's book (Tasting Beer: An Insider's Guide to the World's Greatest Drink. http://www.amazon.com/Tasting-Beer-Insiders-Worlds-Greatest/dp/1603420894/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1398518913&sr=1-1&keywords=tasting+beer)

This in addition to getting more involved with my local beer community already has me feeling more knowledgeable and confident in tasting beer.

Cheers,
 
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