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Mashing vs steeping in BS3

bargoon

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So I'm trying to formulate a partial mash recipe in BS3 and am confused. There is a total of 4 lbs of grains (3 types) and 4 1/2 lbs of DME.

I have TYPE in BS set to "partial mash"

If I set the grains to "mash" I get an estimated ABV of 4.8% @ 151F for 90 min
If I set the grains to "steep" I get an estimated ABV of 3.2% @ 149.8 for 90 min

In my mind steeping and mashing at similiar temps for the same times is in fact "mashing" Does BS3 have a different process for steeping?

So what am I missing here?

 

Oginme

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Steeping is the use of specialty grains (caramel/crystal, toasted, roasted malts) which are pre-converted and only need to have the sugars solubilized and extracted from the grains.  When you tell the program that you are steeping the grains, it uses a lower extraction efficiency number to determine how much sugar is realized from the grains.  The default steeping efficiency in BeerSmith is set at 15% (you can find this at 'options' > 'advanced' > 'steeping efficiency').

Mashing involves use of a base malt which supplies enzymes to convert the starches in the grains to sugars.  When you indicate that the grains are to be mashed, the program defaults to the mash efficiency which is calculated from your brew house efficiency you entered into your equipment profile.  This is normally much higher value than straight steeping will extract.
 

bargoon

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Thanks for your response Oginme,

So if I include a base malt to be soaked, they contain the enzymes that convert the starches to sugar and I should select "mash" for all these grains including speciality malts if using.

But if there is only speciality malts I should select  "steeping"?

Cheers Brian
 
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Oginme said:
Steeping is the use of specialty grains (caramel/crystal, toasted, roasted malts) which are pre-converted and only need to have the sugars solubilized and extracted from the grains.  When you tell the program that you are steeping the grains, it uses a lower extraction efficiency number to determine how much sugar is realized from the grains.  The default steeping efficiency in BeerSmith is set at 15% (you can find this at 'options' > 'advanced' > 'steeping efficiency').

Mashing involves use of a base malt which supplies enzymes to convert the starches in the grains to sugars.  When you indicate that the grains are to be mashed, the program defaults to the mash efficiency which is calculated from your brew house efficiency you entered into your equipment profile.  This is normally much higher value than straight steeping will extract.

So, how do you tell BS3 that you are steeping grains, in terms of the mash profile. I'm brewing a PM recipe where i am steeping specialty grains for 30 mins at 150 deg and then I will do a full boil with LME/DME...etc. Just looking for BS3 to tell me what water vols to use...etc. Or, should I ignore the mash tab for a simple recipe that uses a steep?
 

Oginme

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If you have a recipe that you are making which contains no base malts which need to be mashed, then the recipe type should be 'extract' which indicates to the software that you are steeping your grains and not conducting a mash or partial mash.

 
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perfect. i was thinking that this should be a partial mash equip profile. I now created a new one. so i guess it doesn't matter water vol during the steep. for ~2 lbs of steeping grains, i could just use a gallon of water on the stove top or something. thanks!
 
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