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pilsner vs 6-row

Maine Homebrewer

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I just discovered that 55# sack of 6-row is $20 cheaper than a 55# sack of pilsner malt. Are there any disadvantages to 6-row? I know that it is necessary for adjunct beer, but otherwise I know little about it. Has anyone used it before?
 

merfizle

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6 row has a bit more grainy flavor and higher protein content.  Higher proteins could mean a slightly longer mash.  2-row kernels are more uniform in size.  Check this out:

http://morebeer.com/brewingtechniques/bmg/schwarz.html

How much are you paying for 2-row?  Just curious.  I know a local brewer and I buy bags of Rahr 2-row from him for $27.50.

Cheers,

Mark
 

Maine Homebrewer

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Wow. Wish I knew a local brewer. I have the health food store special order it for me when the do their homebrew supply order, and after bulk discount it costs me $60.  The homebrew shop charges closer to $70. Weyermanns brand.
Thanks for the link. I bookmarked it and will check it out later.
 

merfizle

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Introduce yourself.  :)  We got to know local brewers by going to their release events, inviting them over to try out beers, brew with us, etc.  We also do bulk grain buys twice per year through the Brewers Supply Group.  This last time I bought Munich for $36, Franco Belges Wheat for $40 and Maris Otter for $40.

Mark
 

beernbourbon

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Hey guys!.......
so I've recently gotten into the AG, lovin' it!!
My question to you guys is this...I've noticed a few guys talking about ordering in bulk; how do you guys store the grains(temp, etc)? How long do they last this way, that sort of thing?
 

Maine Homebrewer

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how do you guys store the grains(temp, etc)? How long do they last this way, that sort of thing?

I only get my base grain (pilsner or pale, whole not crushed) in bulk. I just tie the bag off with some rope and leave it on a shelf in the basement.  Specialty grains go in freezer bags (on the shelf next to the base grain, not actually in the freezer, also whole not crushed) with the air pushed out.  So far I haven't had any issues with spoilage. I usually use the base grain up in a year or less, and I've had specialty grains last for years.  I also get my hops in bulk, or by the pound anyway (hopsdirect dot com).  Cuts the cost to a buck or less per ounce. They go in the freezer in a bag with all the air pushed out. I've had hops sit for two years without any noticeable deterioration.
 

merfizle

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Welcome!

I buy 5 or 7 gallons buckets from local hardware store and then get gamma lids.  You put a threaded collar around any bucket and then it's a screw on lid. 



Mark
 

beernbourbon

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Thanks for the welcome!
Never heard of a gamma lid, but I'll look into that. Eventually. I don't even have a grain crusher, so...... baby steps. It just kinda caught my eye, having seen it a couple times about people buying in bulk, and I'm always looking to what the next step is going to be.
I'm only in the midst of my second AG...a nice Belgian Blond Ale.....I'm excited for this one, I learned a lot from the last one. And I even bought the grain for the next one, and planning the one after that....oh no.....methinks I'm addicted!  :eek:

 

Maine Homebrewer

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I ordered ten pounds of the 6-row, just to try it out. For ten bucks, what could go wrong? See what happens.
 

Maine Homebrewer

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I also ordered a ten pounder of flaked maize. I've got plenty of noble hops on hand.  Figure I'll try my hand at an adjunct beer. Something light to enjoy after some yard work.

Thinking 1.035 - 1.040 starting gravity, 60% 6-row and 40% corn, Tettnanger hops, lager yeast. Will post the details as I work it out.

American piss, here I come!
 

MaltLicker

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Friend of mine did just that with extract and flaked maize.  Jokingly dropped in one pellet of hops at three different times and called it "triple hopped." 
 

88Q

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The Difference: 2-Row vs 6-Row Barley
You can see the difference in the images to the right. 2-row is a smaller less yeilding barley, so why bother with it? 6-row barley has three flower florets (kernels) at each node. When the head is viewed top down it looks like there are six rows of kernels since each set of florets are offset and appear to be two rows. This gives you a much higher yield, so, again, why do we bother with 2-row? 2-row barley appears to have two rows of kernels if viewed from the top. All this space the kernels have to grow allow them to become larger and more plump. What does that mean to the brewer? More extract less protein. Yes, Six-row has higher enzymatic power, but in most cases you are not going to be lacking in enzymatic power. More protein means less carbohydrates and as a brewer you are trying to do a mash and the higher carbohydrates are desired. Using a blend or 6-row can be a way to increase your protein levels which can help in head retention and lacing in beer styles where that can be an issue
row.jpg
 

MaltLicker

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Sounds like we could use a small amount of 6-row for head retention like we do wheat. 
 

Maine Homebrewer

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So here's what I did today.

4# pilsner
2# 6-row
2# flaked maize

Mashed in at 142 and left to do some errands. Three hours later it was 138 and passed an iodine test.
Did my usual decoction and only reached 155. 
Half hour later I recirculated for another good half hour before sparging.

Boiled with 1oz Tettnanger (3.9%) for 60 minutes.

Yield was 5.5 gallons at 1.040.  Tasted good.

Pitched a packet of Saflager S-23 at 55 degrees.

Plan to dry hop .25 oz Tettnanger in the secondary.
I know it's borderline blasphemy for a homebrewer to make American adjunct pilsner, but I'm doing it anyway. They say it's the most difficult brew a homebrewer can attempt because with so little flavor there is no wiggle room, and I'm stepping up to the challenge.

See what happens. 
 

Slurk

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Maine Homebrewer said:
I know it's borderline blasphemy for a homebrewer to make American adjunct pilsner, but I'm doing it anyway. They say it's the most difficult brew a homebrewer can attempt because with so little flavor there is no wiggle room, and I'm stepping up to the challenge.
See what happens.

You will see that you again brewed a very good and tastefull beer with a nice profile ;) However, you will realize (again) you didn't even got close to the wiggle room you are referring to.  At least Maine H. you had the guts to try 8)  Cheers!!
Regards,
Slurk
 

Maine Homebrewer

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you will realize (again) you didn't even got close to the wiggle room you are referring to

Yeah. I figure I'll need to use closer to 40% adjuncts to reach that wiggle room. 25% ain't close. Baby steps.  Maybe one day I'll put AB InBev out of business!
 

Maine Homebrewer

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Well that packet of S-23 hadn't done much by this morning, so I pitched in the yeast from a previous batch that I had been using to practice yeast washing. Must have done something right because it took right off.
 

tstinz01

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I used 6 row in an IPA along with 2 row and CC10.  Called it 2x6 IPA.  Turned out pretty tasty.  Revised recipe to add some additional grains for color and malt flavor, but haven't brewed it yet...will soon see how tweaks turn out.
 

durrettd

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I did a Classic American Pilsner (CAP) about four weeks ago and kegged/crashed it (as a clarifying secondary) at three weeks. It's three pounds of flaked corn and ten pounds of 6-row, mashed at 155 F, fermented at 50 F. So far it's very pale, cloudy, has a very faint sweetness, dry finish, and very faint maltiness. Unfortunately, it tastes a lot like a contemporary mass-market Pilsner, but it's been educational. Even if I don't drink much of it, I can palm it off on the unsuspecting, and it was fun to brew.
 
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