• Welcome to the new forum! We upgraded our forum software with a host of new boards, capabilities and features. It is also more secure.
    Jump in and join the conversation! You can learn more about the upgrade and new features here.

Trying to brew heavier beer around the 5.2AV

4

4x

Gaday all,

Just recently I have started trying to brew heavier beer around the 5.2AV mark. Before this I was  turning them out at 3.2AV – 3.6AV with good success.
With the heavier brews I'm using a Cooper's kit as the base and then either liquid or dried to reach my desired SG. This has been giving me a SG around the 1.051 mark.
The yeast that has just been off the top of the can and as usual I rehydrate (250mls -300mls) it an hour or so before hand (1pkt @ 7gms)
The problem (of sorts)
The brew doesn't seem to be fermenting out. SG  1.051 – fg1.017. I now have one sitting around the 1.030 mark
The questions
1.what should I expect my FG's to be?
2.Does the all malt brews take longer to ferment out, say the last 10 -15 points?
3.Is the yeast up to the job? Should I make a large starter? How big?
4.Or should I just increase my SG to 1.060 – 1.065?


TA
4x  ???
 
W

wbc_leelee

Hi 4X,

Kit brews and all extract brews will typically finish at a higher gravity 1.012-1.018, the reason for this is that the extracts are mashed at a higher temp to take into consideration that the kit brews are supposed to have 1 kilo of sugar added to achieve the required starting gravity.
Because the sugar ferments out completely you end up with a gravity a lot lower than with all extract brewing.

your not doing anything wrong.

this is one of the reasons I switched to all grain brewing, It gives me the ability to mash my grains at a lower temp, meaning more fermentables and a lower final gravity.

Don't forget also that the higher your starting gravity the higher your final gravity.

Regards
Andrew
 
T

Triple_Freak

Not necessarily true. I have had big Belgian beers start at 1.088, and finish at 1.008. I had a lager go from 1.145 to 1.040, for an ABV of 14.26%. It depends on the health of your yeast, the temps, how much you oxygenate, etc.
 
L

liquidbrains

Not necessarily true. I have had big Belgian beers start at 1.088, and finish at 1.008. I had a lager go from 1.145 to 1.040, for an ABV of 14.26%. It depends on the health of your yeast, the temps, how much you oxygenate, etc.

While I wouldn't expect an extract wort to ferment out as far as a carefully mashed AG wort, 1.030 seems too high. I have to agree with TF, there are a number of factors that will effect FG.

For bigger beers, make a starter and be sure there is lots of disolved oxygen in the work. For you, this probably means shaking the fermentor -- lots of vigorous shaking.

You might consider rousing the yeast on that 1.030, by giving it a little swirl.

-L
 
4

4x

Hey Thanks for all your input I have taken a little wisdom from each of you. I am Going to do a two can Morgan's Yukon Ale (smoked) with a Coopers Sparkling Ale. I will do a 1.5 starter out one of the yeast packets to get things going. Can't wait for the finished result

Salud
4x  ;D ;D
 
Top