Author Topic: various efficiency metrics  (Read 2300 times)

Offline otherlebowski

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various efficiency metrics
« on: November 01, 2015, 06:58:22 AM »
Couple of questions re: efficiency figures in Beersmith:
* Is there a calculation that compares measured OG vs potential OG?  I would have thought that it was measured efficiency, but that seems to change based on the yield input for each grain addition.
* What is the purpose of the total efficiency figure and how does that relate to the yield figure in each of the grain inputs if at all?

Offline brewfun

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Re: various efficiency metrics
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2015, 08:39:23 AM »
* Is there a calculation that compares measured OG vs potential OG?  I would have thought that it was measured efficiency, but that seems to change based on the yield input for each grain addition.

Within the Mash and Fermentation tabs, there are places to add your actual measured volumes and gravities. These will be calculated on the Fermentation Tab as "Measured Efficiency." So, this reflects your actual results.

So, yes, as you change the recipe ingredients, BeerSmith is using their potential yields against the added measured info.

When adding a new recipe, BeerSmith has random information in the measured fields. This can be zeroed out and you can find "Save as Default" in the Home ribbon. Now, new recipes will not have bogus data in them.

Quote
* What is the purpose of the total efficiency figure and how does that relate to the yield figure in each of the grain inputs if at all?

Total Efficiency is your Brewhouse Efficiency (BHE) from your equipment profile. BHE is the percentage of all available sugar that gets into the fermenter. In doing so, it accounts for all losses between the grain and the fermenter.

Mash Efficiency is the combined result of conversion and sparge efficiency, as measured in the kettle. It only reflects what's pulled from the grain and kettle sugars, not any of the other losses after the kettle.

If you tell BeerSmith you expect 80% Total Efficiency (BHE), you're saying that 80% of all the available sugars will get into the fermenter. If you add to trub loss, what you'll see is an increase in mash efficiency, not a change in gravity. Since you've stated 80% BHE, then the additional volume must have the same gravity as the rest of the wort. The only way for that to happen is to get better mash efficiency.



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