Author Topic: Remaking the same recipe  (Read 1833 times)

Offline rcbran

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Remaking the same recipe
« on: August 01, 2019, 07:28:05 PM »
I'm fairly new to BeerSmith. I have a recipe that I make often, with minor tweeks to the ingredients and process. What's the best way to take the existing recipe and start a new version with the same ingredients and equipment but no brew day and fermentation data from the previous one? Thanks!

Offline jomebrew

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2019, 07:56:43 PM »
You have a recipe that is the base. Each time you brew it, copy the recipe to the brew log and make changes based on that brew session.

If you decide to make new or changes to the base, then either copy the brew log version to the recipes folder or modify the original recipe to make it the new base.

Offline rcbran

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2019, 08:01:25 PM »
Thank you. When you copy and paste a recipe, does it carry all the brewing data, such as measured gravity, etc. with it?

Offline Oginme

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2019, 10:43:25 PM »
Yes, the copy of the recipe in brew log is an exact copy of the  original. 

The way I manage this is to keep all the recipes outside of brew log as master copies and only record brew day data on the copy within brew log.  This way I can make tweaks to the brew log copy and keep the master copy pristine until the results are realized and I like the changes.

There is more information on using the brew log function in other threads on the forum which can be found using the search function.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2019, 07:29:01 AM by Oginme »
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Offline Kevin58

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2019, 07:29:33 AM »
Another creative way to use the copy and paste of a base recipe is to make a recipe that only has the steps and items that you use in every recipe. This template has no fermentables, hops or yeast but it does contain all of the things that I use every time such as my equipment profile... whirlfloc and yeast nutrient additions. I even created a miscellaneous step called "pump and chiller". Doing so helps me remember these steps and saves me from adding them to every recipe. Now when I go to add a new recipe I just copy the template and paste it and away I go. I have made several folders for my recipes... Pale Ales... Porers & Stouts... Clones, etc. I keep a copy of my template in each folder which may be overkill but it works for me.
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Offline Oginme

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2019, 07:35:06 AM »
To expand on the brew log function, now that I am awake and somewhat more coherent (I hope), there is a button on the toolbar ribbon labeled 'copy to log'.  When you highlight a recipe and click this button, it will place an exact copy of that recipe into a new folder called 'brew log'.  You can then take and make any minor updates (such as hop %AA, or malt potential) or changes before your brew date.  It is at this point I assign the brew date to the recipe (I keep all my originals with the date of 1/1/2001 so that I can easily distinguish an original from a brew log copy if I have both open).  Brew day data can be entered into the brew log copy of the recipe and saved.  Each occurrence of the recipe I have brewed can be reviewed and updates made to the master copy outside of brew log if there is something that I want to make permanent.
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Offline dtapke

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2019, 09:05:48 AM »
To expand on the brew log function, now that I am awake and somewhat more coherent (I hope), there is a button on the toolbar ribbon labeled 'copy to log'.  When you highlight a recipe and click this button, it will place an exact copy of that recipe into a new folder called 'brew log'. 

I hate myself. How have I never noticed this. I literally made a folder called "Brew Log" and have been copying my recipes there manually.
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Offline rcbran

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2019, 09:34:21 AM »
Thank you! So, just to be sure I understand the process you are describing, when I make a basic recipe up, I don't use that file to add brewing and fermenting info, but instead treat it as the "master" and click, Copy to Log to make a copy that I then use for logging the data for the session. Thanks again for the responses. CB

Offline Oginme

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Re: Remaking the same recipe
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2019, 10:50:34 AM »
Thank you! So, just to be sure I understand the process you are describing, when I make a basic recipe up, I don't use that file to add brewing and fermenting info, but instead treat it as the "master" and click, Copy to Log to make a copy that I then use for logging the data for the session. Thanks again for the responses. CB

You understand the process completely!  One of the other nice features of using the Brew Log folder is that you can set up the BeerSmith calendar to only include those recipes which are listed in Brew Log.

Recycle your grains, feed them to a goat!

 

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