Author Topic: Using the Water Profile Tool  (Read 4596 times)

Offline Rep

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Using the Water Profile Tool
« on: November 13, 2013, 09:33:19 AM »
I want to begin using the Water Profile Tool and will have some questions that members may have answers.

I will be using RO water in making an American Amber Ale.  I need to choose a Target Profile that will fit an Amber American Ale. 

When I examine the list of offered Target Profiles, how does one choose the profile to begin work with?  Is it I just make the best guess I can, or, is there a more direct way of making that choice?

Then, after clicking the Calculate Best Additions button the additions and grams of that addition I am to make to my base water will fill in.  And my Base Water will now look very similar to my Target Water
« Last Edit: November 13, 2013, 09:46:31 AM by Rep »

Offline durrettd

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Re: Using the Water Profile Tool
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2013, 10:10:24 AM »
Beersmith is a great tool, but for water adjustments I use Bru'n Water. It's free at     https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Martin Brungard is a water chemist and spreadsheet wizard. His system has more moving parts than BeerSmith and it takes a little reading to understand it. It's worth the effort.

He has plenty of city water profiles (both native and boiled profiles) as well as color/malt/bitterness profiles.

Offline Rep

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Re: Using the Water Profile Tool
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2013, 11:23:37 AM »
Beersmith is a great tool, but for water adjustments I use Bru'n Water. It's free at     https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Martin Brungard is a water chemist and spreadsheet wizard. His system has more moving parts than BeerSmith and it takes a little reading to understand it. It's worth the effort.

He has plenty of city water profiles (both native and boiled profiles) as well as color/malt/bitterness profiles.

I have looked at Bruin Water and see its quality.  My needs are rather simple and I would like to keep everything in one software package.  Thanks for the suggestion.

Offline ihikeut

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Re: Using the Water Profile Tool
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2013, 12:45:45 PM »
Beersmith is a great tool, but for water adjustments I use Bru'n Water. It's free at     https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Martin Brungard is a water chemist and spreadsheet wizard. His system has more moving parts than BeerSmith and it takes a little reading to understand it. It's worth the effort.

He has plenty of city water profiles (both native and boiled profiles) as well as color/malt/bitterness profiles.

+1
Brunwater is the best water profile tool right now. Most of the time you use different tools or software for different things.

Offline MaltLicker

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Re: Using the Water Profile Tool
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2013, 01:36:45 PM »
I will be using RO water in making an American Amber Ale.  I need to choose a Target Profile that will fit an Amber American Ale. 

When I examine the list of offered Target Profiles, how does one choose the profile to begin work with?  Is it I just make the best guess I can, or, is there a more direct way of making that choice?

I divide water adjustments in two.  My water is low in everything.  First, I add calcium and a touch of magnesium to all batches for yeast health and fermentation reasons.   That same calcium helps with hot and cold break and clarity also. 

Then I look at beer style and point the Chloride:Sulfate ratio to either Malty, Balanced or Bitter.   On all chemicals I aim roughly for the recommended minimums for brewing per Palmer's worksheet, rather than, for example, really spiking sulfates to drive bitterness.   My fear there is making five gallons of minerally-tasting beer. 

I largely ignore historical water profiles since reading that way back in the day, we really don't know what they did to the native water before brew-day, nor do we know the exact source of every day's water needs.  They could have pulled from numerous wells and had different water profiles each season, etc.   I use those historical profiles merely as examples of water that might suit the style rather than rule of law.