Author Topic: Gluten Free in SLC  (Read 6724 times)

GF_Brewer

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Gluten Free in SLC
« on: September 25, 2008, 07:38:50 PM »
Hello Everyone,

I am a gluten free brewer because I have Celiac disease. I have brewed 3 GF (gluten free) brews so far using beersmith (had to add sorghum syrup manually but still nice), and am in full experimental mode with GF brewing. If anyone else is brewing GF, or wants to, talk to me and we can help each other out.

Cheers all,

Ian

Offline drowningman

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2008, 08:43:21 PM »
Hello GF-

I am not plagued by celiac, but I have a good friend who is.  I had had him over to make a batch of blueberry sorghum using Danstar Nottingham yeast.  It turned out tasty, but nothing like beer- more like champaign.  It was pink and very dry.

In this 5.5 gallon recipe I used:
6.6 lbs of NW Sorghum Syrup
1 lb Flaked Rice
1/2 lb Maltodextrin
1 can of Oregon Blueberry syrup
2 oz of crystal whole leaf (~ 3.8 alpha) split boil/flavor-aroma

I'm sure it was the Danstar yeast that made it so dry and a bit surprised- have you used Nottingham yeast and what are your experiences?
My sorghum was a little weak, what is your syrup to batch size ratio?  My next batch will be a straight "beer" and I'm considering using 9.9 lbs of syrup.  Any thoughts on adding this much for a 5.5g batch?
I have ordered more syrup, but I would like to find Sorghum malt (or atleast straight grain to malt myself) to add more body and make a "bigger" beer.  Do you know of any resources?

Thanks tons. I've been at this hobby a while and am always willing to help with anything I know.
Dman

GF_Brewer

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2008, 09:12:52 PM »
I haven't used Notty yeast yet, because my local hombrew shop is always out of that stuff. I have used safale us-05, s-04, and t-58. t-58 is a "specialty yeast" and it is supposed to make spicy esters, but the only thing I notice from it is it ferments pretty clean, and my only brew so far that has tasted "beer-like" was made with this yeast. I think the key to making a good GF beer is making sure the fermentation is quick and clean. On my last batch I also rehydrated the t-58 yeast with 100 deg. F water, and added yeast nutrient. It fermented very quickly and turned out pretty nice. I brewed a new batch on Sunday night and I put roughly 8 lbs. of sorghum, with millenium and cascade hops for about 5.5 g batch. So, I'm still waiting on that one to see how it is. I hope I answered some of your questions, don't hesitate to ask more, or share your experiences.

Thanks!!

Ian

Offline drowningman

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2008, 03:33:10 PM »
Hey GFB-

Thanks for the reply.  Likewise, I don't have local access to the Safe ale products, though I can find them on line.  I just received some Danstar Windsor GF yeast that I read is good for full bodied English style ales.  If you're interested I would be up for a swap.

The only question I still have is whether or not you know of a resource for sorghum malt?  I have done some research and don't think I'll be malting anytime soon- intense attention is necessary over about a week and the sprouts actually contain a form of cyanide!  Don't know if I'd feel fully secure that I removed all the rootlets.

My problem is that I really want to work on a fuller-bodied beer.

Thanks for sharing and I'll be brewing a batch soon so I'll post my experience.

Dman

Offline SOGOAK

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2008, 10:27:31 AM »
I'm naive to Celiac, but I think it is awesome that there is a way to enjoy beer or fermented bevies still. 

DMan, Chicagowinemakers @ IL83 and IL64 has Fermentis Yeasts.  Kyle -Owner is a great guy.  They also usually have a whole fridge of great whole leaf hops.  He also has pretty good equipment and other stuff there.  Don't let the name fool you, I think they do a lot of winebiz but they are at least 50/50 with brew and he brews.

It is a bit of a haul for you, but I like the location and try to "work it into" my sales calls.

US-05 yeast is soooo easy. 
« Last Edit: December 18, 2008, 10:45:29 AM by SOGOAK »
Good Recipe, Good Ingredients, Good Procedure, Good Sanitation = Good Brew.

Offline drowningman

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2008, 11:06:55 AM »
Sogoak,

Thanks for the suggestion.  But I actually lived in Lombard for four years (mid 90's) and Winemakers was my first experience with homebrewing.  I didn't take the bait b/c I read his how to brew "dissertation" that he handed out to newbies... scared the S**t out of me and I was sure I would fail.  Ha- I still have that pamphlet filed away.

I'd like to share some info on Celiac's with you and anyone else that may like to learn or know anything more to add:

Celiac's Disease is the intestinal system's inability to tolerate gluten, which is a protein found in most wheat-related grains.  Rye, barley, and oats all contain gluten.  For people with this condition, gluten inhibits the organ's walls from absorbing nutrients.  The disease creates abdominal pain and can actually lead to serious digestive complications.  Breads, cereals, and most snacks are off limits.  It's really surprising how many foods contain some element of wheat gluten.  My good friend who brews sorghum with me actually found that Rice Crispies contain wheat gluten... RICE Crispies?!!

Digestable food replacements are rice, corn, and sorghum-based products though many gluten-free foods have a gritty texture and unfortunately fail to match the "spongier" cake or soft cookie texture we've all become used to.  However, advancements have been made and I've tasted some fairly delicious gluten free foods.

Sorghum is the replacement grain (actually considered/called a berry) for grain beer.  I've been experimenting with it and trying to create comparable brews to light ales, and IPAs.  Two major problems exist for any other type of dark or big beer:

1) Yeast cultures are limited.  Most yeast is cultured in beer wort.  Even using a small portion of liquid yeast could be enough to harm a person with Celiac.  What is available in dry yeast are typically made for broad light ales.  Sorghum "lager" yeast are not available to my knowledge.

2) Malted sorghum seems to be impossible to find.  You can get your hands on sorghum berries pretty cheap, but then the process of malting is time consuming and critical.  I have read that it requires attention every six to eight hours over about a week.  Also, the rootlets created during germination actually contain a type of cyanide.  Like all malted grain these are to be "tumbled" off prior to use, however, who would want to be responsible for this in home-malting?  The point is, there doesn't seem to be a current option for obtaining sorghum malt crucial to mouth feel, flavor, or color if you want to attempt brewing a sorghum porter or stout style beer.

If anybody knows of a resource or are able to get in contact with a brewery using sorghum malt I would really appreciate a contact.

Anyway, I hope this has been useful and not too long in the tooth.Sogoak, maybe we could meet for a beer somewhere and trade a homebrew or two (open to anybody near northern IL).

Dman

Offline SOGOAK

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2008, 08:03:56 PM »
Dman, Sounds good.  The next couple weeks are especially busy.  (Youngest sis-in-law getting married too)  After that, I'm down for a pop or two or a tradesy. 

I have almost all my pieces together for my mashtun.  So I'll be hopefully embarking on all grain in the next couple weeks.

The original guy at winemakers is phasing himself out.  The new guy Kyle is much less intense. 

Does Fox River carry Safale?  I've never been there.  If I got to yet another shop it'll be the homebrew shop of St. Charles. Ed Seaman really supports the UKG.    A run to Midcountry for some bags of MAris Otter is also on my todo list.
Good Recipe, Good Ingredients, Good Procedure, Good Sanitation = Good Brew.

Offline drowningman

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Re: Gluten Free in SLC
« Reply #7 on: December 25, 2008, 08:04:29 PM »
Hey Sogoak,

Sory for the delay- just like you said, real busy this time of year and I don't even have to attend an in-laws' wedding.

Good luck with the mashtun.  I still haven't come round to going all grain, but someday when I can invest into the larger brewing equip...

Fox Valley HB is a great place to buy stuff, but I have never seen safale there.  HB Shop has a pretty good selection themselves, but I'm not sure they have Safale either.  He's big with Whitelabs.

If your interested in Maris Otter, I might be able to help you.  Shoot me a message if you are.
Dman